Tess Daniels

World News Writer

Wed

28

Mar

2018

Pope Francis Celebrates 5 Years as Pope

by Tess Daniels

 

On March 1, Pope Francis celebrated the five-year anniversary of his election to the papacy. With this milestone comes an examination of Francis’s accomplishments and controversies. Francis, though a hugely influential and compelling figure, has nonetheless had his fair share of criticism. He is seen by the world as a reformer pope—a humble, highly educated, genial Jesuit who seems to depart from the practices of previous pontiffs. On the other hand, traditionalist Catholics have objected to Francis’ agenda, arguing that a pope should deliver doctrinal and moral clarity, and Francis’s policy has blurred Catholic teachings.

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Wed

31

Jan

2018

Pope Apologizes to Sex Abuse Victims; Defends Accused Bishop

by Tess Daniels

 

Aboard the papal flight to Lima, Peru, Pope Francis apologized for comments made in Iquique, Chile concerning victims of clergy sex abuse. He says that he now realizes that he unknowingly wounded the victims.

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Sun

17

Dec

2017

Pope Francis Visits Myanmar and Bangladesh

by Tess Daniels

 

In early December, Pope Francis concluded a diplomatically-tricky visit to Asia, where he visited the countries of Myanmar and Bangladesh. Many people apprehensively watched the trip to see whether he would speak out about the controversial term “Rohingya.” The Rohingya, who are described as “the world’s most persecuted minority,” are a Muslim ethnic group who have lived for centuries in the majority-Buddhist Myanmar. Nearly all of the Rohingya in Myanmar live in the extremely poor state of Rakhine and are not allowed to leave without government permission. Several governments, including the United Sates, have declared the recent violence against the Rohingya to be an act of ethnic cleansing, an accusation which the military has denied. Due to their ongoing persecution, over 600,000 Rohingya have been  forced to flee the Rakhine State towards neighboring Bangladesh, where they are denied refugee status.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Kinship Across Borders: Catholic Ethics and Migration

by Tess Daniels

 

Immigration remains one of the most hotly contested topics in our current political climate. In her lecture “Kinship Across Borders: Catholic Ethics and Migration,” Boston College Theology professor Kristin E. Heyer reworked the narrative to include Catholicism, describing the numerous dimensions a Catholic perspective adds to the immigration narrative. Heyer reevaluated immigration and migration not in the usual partisan manner, but with a scope that encompasses the humanity of migrants.

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Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Paris Statement

 

by Tess Daniels

 

In early October, ten well-known European intellectuals signed The Paris Statement: A Europe We Can Believe In[KD1] , in which they declared that a false and pseudo-utopian Europe threatens everyone and that all must defend the real Europe. This real Europe is defined by solidarity, civic loyalty, and patriotic love for the nation-state.

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Thu

26

Oct

2017

Church Urges Dialogue in Catalonia

 

by Tess Daniels

 

Catalonia, one of Spain’s 17 autonomous regions, lies in the midst of an independence controversy that has plunged Spain into one of its worst political crisis in decades. Secession in Catalonia has long been controversial, with separatists advocating fervently for Catalonia to become its own sovereign state. In an Oct. 1 referendum, declared illegal by the central government in Madrid, 42% of the eligible electorate cast their ballots, and an overwhelming 90% voted for secession. Police responded to the vote by shutting down polling stations, confiscating ballots, and even using batons and rubber bullets, leaving an estimated 800 people injured. Polling shows Catalans more divided on this issue than the referendum might lead one to believe, with 41% favoring independence and under 50% remaining unopposed.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Pope Francis Visits War-Weary Colombia

by Tess Daniels

 

Pope Francis arrived in Colombia for a five-day visit earlier this month, determined to advocate reconciliation and forgiveness to the Colombian people, whose country has been bitterly divided for decades. The country has been torn apart by internal violence between government forces and guerilla militias, most notably the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Yet, in late 2016, the Colombian Congress approved peace accords with FARC. After a referendum for a similar deal failed earlier that year, the government reworked it and both houses of Congress, controlled overwhelmingly by President Juan Manuel Santos’s coalition, passed the deal. About 7,000 FARC rebels left the jungle and began the process of returning to civilian life. However, for many Colombian citizens, the conflict cannot be easily forgotten, and understandably so: an estimated 220,000 people were killed and about 6 million displaced through the decades of violence.

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