Dante Keeler

Campus News Columnist

Tue

06

Dec

2016

The Hope of the Epiphanies

by Dante Keeler

 

As we prepare for finals over the next few weeks, there is a light down the road that brightens our paths, the same light that lit the way for the Magi to approach Bethlehem. This light is the light of Christ as he comes into the world; we know the familiar images of shepherds, kings, and angels that come to worship him. Celebrated on January 6, the feast of the Epiphany commemorates different things, depending on which branch of Christianity you belong to. It’s one of the oldest feasts celebrated in the Christian tradition, and predates the celebration of Christmas. Originally (and still today, in some Eastern Catholic and Orthodox traditions), the feast of the Epiphany celebrated four different events: the Nativity, the adoration of the Magi, the Baptism of Jesus, and the first miracle at the wedding in Cana. Most Catholics think of the Epiphany as referring to the second event, the arrival of the Magi. All four of these events are revelations of God to man; I like to think of them as each revealing a different part about Jesus’ character as fully human and fully divine. That’s what Epiphany means, after all: a revelation.  

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Tue

25

Oct

2016

Rebuilding Faith Communities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Serbia

by Dante Keeler

 

“The revival of the ideology of religious nationalism was one of the main causes of the wars in which Yugoslavia broke apart” said Alen Kristić Thursday evening. “Are religions still useful when the horrors of war, symbolized by the cities of Vukovar, Srebrenica, and Sarajevo, were possible?” Kristić teaches at the University of Zagreb in Croatia and spoke at BC as the second speaker of the three-part series “Faith Communities and Civil Society During and After Conflict.” The series focuses on Syria, Croatia, Serbia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, with talks from Jewish, Christian, and Muslim scholars.

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Tue

27

Sep

2016

Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts at McMullen Museum

by Dante Keeler

 

The Boston College McMullen Museum of Art currently exhibits the largest-ever collection of illustrated medieval and Renaissance texts in North America. Nancy Netzer, the director of the McMullen, and her staff (including over 25 student ambassadors) have worked hard to bring the new museum to life for the Boston community. Together with Harvard’s Houghton Library and the Gardner Museum, the three museums showcase illustrated manuscripts important for medieval and renaissance persons from all walks of life. Experts from over 18 institutions in the Boston area selected the texts, organizing them into three categories: Manuscripts for Pleasure & Piety (at the McMullen), Manuscripts from Church & Cloister (Harvard), and Italian Renaissance Books (Gardner). Boston College’s exhibit primarily focuses on bibles, commentaries, prayer books, and other texts written for lay people, while also displaying a few paintings, drawings, and an immense carpet. Most of the manuscripts are from the 15th and 16th centuries due to the surging literacy rates during those times, but some pieces date as far back as the 12th century.

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