Adriana Watkins

 

Managing Editor

 

Adriana Watkins is the Managing Editor of The Torch, and was Campus News Editor from 2017-18. She studies French and English, and believes in joyful writing with ruthless copyediting. She hopes to be an author.

Thu

01

Nov

2018

Catholic Church Responds to Synagogue Shooting

Police officers are seen after a gunman killed eleven people Oct. 27 at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. (CNS photo/John Altdorfer, Reuters)
Police officers are seen after a gunman killed eleven people Oct. 27 at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. (CNS photo/John Altdorfer, Reuters)

by Adriana Watkins

 

On Saturday, October 27, a shooter killed 11 people worshipping at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, PA. The attack came as congregants were participating in Shabbat morning prayer services and a bris (or circumcision) ceremony. The shooter, 46-year-old Robert Bowers, was injured in the confrontation with police and taken into custody. He made his first court appearance the following Monday, and is being charged with 44 federal counts, most of them relating to malicious targeting of a religious group.

Read More

Thu

01

Nov

2018

Giving the Homily: A Priest's Perspective

by Adriana Watkins

 

A Catholic who goes to Mass every Sunday and holiday has, by age 18, heard nearly 1,000 homilies. That same Catholic has brainstormed, composed, and delivered about zero. For priests, of course, the practice is routine—and in a recent series of interviews, six clergy at Boston College illuminated some of the mysteries surrounding it.

Read More

Thu

01

Nov

2018

Wall of Lies

by Adriana Watkins

 

My family spends Sundays at a packed Catholic church, where the pews are full. In such close quarters, the voices of the congregation seem louder to me than at other churches—not least of all during the Kyrie and Confiteor, two confessions of guilt and pleas for mercy. After Mass, we leave the parish and drive past a nearby landmark. It’s a large plywood billboard that reads in colorful letters, “YOU ARE PERFECT.” I call it the Wall of Lies.

Read More

Wed

26

Sep

2018

Homesickness as an Echo of God

by Adriana Watkins

 

There are some problems so ordinary it feels wrong to suffer because of them. Around October, when 95% of the student body catches the same common cold, your peers might be understanding of you, but they won’t be too sympathetic. There will come a time, as you drown in Kleenex, that you realize it’s silly to complain. All you’ll likely hear in response is, “Me too, and I’ve got pinkeye.” Someone will always have it worse, and you might feel bad for struggling so much with a burden everyone seems to have.

Read More

Wed

26

Sep

2018

Partying Gregorian-Style

by Adriana Watkins

 

If you’ve been on campus at least one weekend, you’ve heard the beat of bass-lines on a Friday night. Of course, there’s plenty of shouting and laughing and singing along, too. But have you ever wondered, as you weaved through dorm buildings, what all the noise is for? All the upbeat, celebratory songs—what’s the occasion?

 

“Well,” you say. “I’m not sure about that, but I do know when I’m talking to a killjoy.”

            

Granted—but on thinking further, you’d probably answer, “We’re celebrating Friday night.”

Read More

Thu

03

May

2018

Religion and Skepticism on Campus: An Interview with Bishop Barron

by Adriana Watkins

 

On April 24, Bishop Robert Barron, theologian and founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries, spoke with The Torch staff on the subject of religion and skepticism. The Bishop began by describing skepticism as a perspective that often “traps” its adherents “in Plato’s Cave,” unable to broaden their views. He then went on to describe possible benefits of the outlook, especially in the context of the university, and to offer advice to students as they continue their search for the truth.

Read More

Thu

03

May

2018

Hookup Culture an "Aspirin for Loneliness"

by Adriana Watkins

 

On April 12, a large group of Boston College students filled a Merkert lecture hall. They were there to hear Fr. Paul McNellis, S.J., speak about the landscape of modern college sexuality, in a talk entitled, “The Hookup Culture: Here to Stay?”The lecture came at what McNellis considers an important moment, as the normalization of transient sexuality has made hookups “just one [more] lifestyle choice.”

Read More

Thu

03

May

2018

Alfie Evans Case Renews Humane Healthcare Debate

Image: Katie James / Facebook
Image: Katie James / Facebook

by Adriana Watkins

 

Alfie Evans, a child removed from life support by a British hospital, died on April 28 after a lengthy legal debate surrounding his care. His case gained international attention in the week before his death, as his parents petitioned the court to overturn the decision that would remove him from his ventilator. Evans’ situation has been compared to that of Charlie Gard, who died in 2017 after a similar court-ordered removal from life support. 

Read More

Sun

01

Apr

2018

BREAKING: Messiah Risen, Apostles Skeptical

by Adriana Watkins

 

Writers from The Jerusalem Courier were approached early this morning by local women who claim to have seen Jesus of Nazareth walking in a garden. Mary of Magdalene reports to have seen the man, who was crucified Friday, in perfect health and heavenly countenance. She adds that she also found two Roman guards asleep under a nearby outcropping of trees.

Read More

Wed

28

Mar

2018

Model UN Gives Historical, Religious Perspectives

by Adriana Watkins

 

On the weekend of March 16-18, approximately 650 high school students flooded hotel rooms at the Westin Copley. The students, who came from around the country and the world, arrived in Boston with suits and ties, extensive notes, and starry eyes. Phones were put away one by one as the crowds filed into their conference rooms. The doors shut, the noise died, and the fun began: the teenagers were no longer students, but delegates. Their goal? To save the world.

Read More

Wed

28

Mar

2018

Quizes, Horoscopes, and Self-Identity

by Adriana Watkins

 

There is no way to write this article without sounding like a killjoy. If the reader will forgive me, I think it’s worthwhile to talk about self-identification and social media. Specifically, BuzzFeed quizzes, “tag yourself” memes, astrological signs, and all the other things pop culture offers to help us fill in the blanks about our identities. We consume these things for fun, but to what extent do they illustrate a real search for self-knowledge?

Read More

Tue

27

Feb

2018

Superbowl Ad Misuses MLK Speech

 

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Though the Superbowl is a few weeks past, it is profitable to talk for a moment about a controversial advertisement premiered during the game. The spot in question was created by Ram, the automobile company, to promote a line of pickup trucks. Instead, the ad promoted passionate discussions over its voiceover material—a 1968 sermon by the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., titled “The Drum Major Instinct.”

Read More

Tue

27

Feb

2018

Flu Season: Statistics and Liturgical Consequences

By: Adriana Watkins

 

The United States has faced a particularly dire flu season this winter, with the number of cases rising weekly from November into February. All regions of the country have reported higher-than-normal levels of flu activity, according to the CDC, with the expected total of hospitalizations reaching the hundreds of thousands. The peak seems to be leveling off, though officials warn the flu will still continue to circulate in the weeks to come.    

Read More

Wed

31

Jan

2018

“No Exit” is No Laughing Matter

by Adriana Watkins

 

As the January cold settled in, and students enclosed themselves in their dorm rooms, the Boston College Theatre Department debuted No Exit. The play ran from January 26-28 in the Bonn Studio—a space that became, for the weekend, a glimpse into Hell.

Read More

Sun

17

Dec

2017

Joy to the World: The Geography of Christmas

by Adriana Watkins

 

It’s early December. You’re in the car. The radio DJ announces that “Silent Night” is playing next, with a verse in the original German. “German?” you think to yourself. You often forget this classic carol wasn’t written in English—and perhaps you feel a sense of discontent. Do you even know what Christmas looks like in Germany? Or in Kenya? Or in the Philippines? Your own traditions and memories of the holiday bring you plenty of joy—but what does this joy look like for others?

 

Here are a few ways other nations commemorate the birth of our Lord:

Read More

Wed

29

Nov

2017

Fr. James Martin Outlines Ideas for Inclusion

by Adriana Watkins

 

On Sunday, November 12, Fr. James Martin, S.J., visited St. Ignatius Parish to lecture on methods of LGBT inclusion. The talk, which was well-attended, drew interested members from both the St. Ignatius community and the Boston College student body. The lecture was based on Fr. Martin’s recently published book, Building a Bridge, which identifies ways in which “the Catholic Church and the LGBT community can enter into a relationship of respect, compassion, and sensitivity.” He elaborated on each of these three aspects individually, attempting to describe his own vision for dialogue and acceptance.

Read More

Wed

29

Nov

2017

Friendship: What, Why, and How

 

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm & Adriana Watkins

 

“Friendship,” C. S. Lewis writes. “Is born at the moment when one man says to another, What! You too? I thought that no one but myself…

Read More

Thu

26

Oct

2017

#TrumpTweets: The Use and Abuse of Media

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

At this moment, you’re one Google search away from Donald Trump’s eight-year Twitter history—a corpus composed of 36,200 messages. Often, even those who don’t use Twitter end up seeing or hearing about these 140-character media bursts, a series of “sound-bytes” that tells us what the President is thinking, doing, or planning. Many users appreciate the updates (Trump has some 41 million followers) while others critique his use of social media (a quick Google search will show you that). While there are strong opinions on both sides, few voices argue that his presence on Twitter is unimportant.

Read More

Thu

26

Oct

2017

BC Conference Invites Dialogue on Amoris Laetitia

 

 by Adriana Watkins

 

Sensing a need for increased understanding between clergy and families, Pope Francis released his papal exhortation Amoris Laetitia in April of 2016. The document, whose title means “Joyful Love,” enumerated several challenges facing the modern family. It was intended as a starting point for further conversation, and in a recent symposium, Boston College provided an environment in which to continue this discussion.

Read More

Tue

26

Sep

2017

A Multitude of Selves: Accountability and Taylor Swift

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

There’s nothing like a little vengeance to kick start your day.

 

 

Recently, after the recommendation of a friend, I listened to Taylor Swift’s new song, “Look What You Made Me Do.” Now, I realize this song has been circulating for about a month, and any attempt to address it would seem passé. However, the opportunity to examine these lyrics and discuss their implications is too tempting. 

Read More

Tue

26

Sep

2017

Students Express Compassion After Marseille Attack

by Adriana Watkins

 

On Sunday, September 17, four Boston College juniors were attacked with hydrochloric acid while traveling in southern France. The incident, which occurred around 11 A.M., took place in the Marseille-St. Charles train station, and was committed by a mentally-unstable woman. Two of the juniors were injured in the attack, though they are making a full recovery. Meanwhile, the students have been lauded for expressing their compassion towards their attacker, whose illness, said one, “should not be villainized.”

Read More

Tue

25

Apr

2017

Expectations vs. Reality: Divine Mercy Sunday

by Adriana Watkins

 

The Catholic Church is good at celebrating. After the seemingly-endless forty days of Lent, there comes a parade of feasts; we pack more holidays into twenty-four hours than greeting-card companies can invent arbitrarily. There’s a lot going on this time of year. Here’s an example: all at once, it can be the Friday of the Octave of Easter and St. Anselm’s feast day and the eighth day of the Divine Mercy novena…take a breath when you can!

 

But it’s that last event I’d like to focus on—the Divine Mercy novena. Sunday, April 23, marks the conclusion of this annual prayer. Beginning on Easter, participants recite a Divine Mercy chaplet once a day, offering each devotion to a different group of people. The first day, for example, is dedicated “to all mankind,” while subsequent days are focused on more specific groups like priests, unbelievers, and the souls in Purgatory. These devotions (along with the chaplet prayer itself) were given by Christ to St. Faustina Kowalska in a series of visions. You can read about them in her personal diaries.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Extra, Extra: The Best News in the World

 

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Everywhere we look, there’s news. Televised broadcasts, online articles, nicely printed papers like this one—countless voices crying out, “You need to know this.” Sometimes a piece of news divides our lives in two: before and after. That is the story of the Annunciation. Commemorated on March 25, this feast commemorates the angel Gabriel’s announcement of the Incarnation to Mary, resulting in the most bizarre headline of all time—God becomes Man.

Read More

Wed

22

Feb

2017

Saint Blaise and the Role of the Corporeal

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Here’s an experiment: stop a pedestrian walking down Commonwealth Avenue and inform them that, on a recent Friday, several million people worldwide lined up to have candles pressed on their necks. You may receive some comical responses. As strange as the statement sounds, however, it describes the feast of St. Blaise, celebrated on February 3rd and accompanied by a “blessing of the throats.” Though many of us are happy enough to accept the blessing as an obscure tradition, what do we know about its origins? How much do we know about St. Blaise himself? Asking ourselves these questions can help us explain the cherished custom to that bewildered pedestrian.

 

Read More

Tue

06

Dec

2016

“A Story of Men and Women”: Chorale Sing Carols from Near and Far

Chorale Singing Carols

by Adriana Watkins

 

If you heard rapturous applause emanating from Trinity Chapel this weekend, you can thank “Christmas on the Heights.” From December 2-4, the University Chorale and the Boston College Symphony Orchestra (BCSO) held their winter concert, an event that would have been worth much more than the ten-dollar admission price. John Finney conducted a program of traditional carols, from “O Holy Night” to a beautiful setting of the “Ave Maria.” The songs were listed in print alongside their national origins; this made it especially evident how the hymns wove together praises from countries across the world.

Read More

BC Torch on Facebook Visit us on Facebook


Trending Articles