Faith Features

Wed

30

Jan

2019

New Year, New Us, Same God

by Ejuma Adoga

 

January is a time of rebirth, fresh starts, and clean beginnings. “New year, new me” is a popular slogan for this time of resolution, but as the year progresses, I’ve found that many people feel they’ve messed up their resolutions and declare that the new year is cancelled. I came across an insightful blog post during Christmas break that explained why we shouldn't give up on the year after “failing” to complete the resolution. The author said that we should set smaller, more attainable goals, a decision which takes some of the pressure off of us. Smaller goals are ideally much more manageable and easier to complete. After reading the article, I realized how applicable this is to my life and the life of my peers. 

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

Finding God in All Things and All Places

Photo of Quito, Ecuador
Photo of Quito, Ecuador

by Amanda Judah

 

The first three weeks of my semester abroad in Ecuador have given me ample opportunity to consider “cosmology,” or the way humans view their position in the world. Although this topic was originally introduced to me in a classroom setting, outside experiences navigating the city and local culture have prompted me to question how the societies in which we were raised can have a profound, and often unconscious, effect on our perspective.

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

The Silent Game: Thoughts from Manresa

Retreatants from the Winter Break Session of Manresa 2019
Retreatants from the Winter Break Session of Manresa 2019

by Noella D'Souza

 

Before the start of this semester, I indulged myself in my longest round of the quiet game to date: Manresa, a 5-day silent retreat offered by BC Campus Ministry and structured around the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. Manresa is named after the town where Ignatius spent a period of time entering deeper into his spiritual life and developing the exercises, a cornerstone of Ignatian spirituality. Going into the retreat, I was looking forward to learning more about a new spiritual practice, doing some self-reflection, and mentally preparing myself for the coming semester—but I was a little apprehensive about the concept of five days spent in silence. Having just finished the retreat, here are some of my thoughts.

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

Ora et Labora

Ora et Labora, from a stained glass window of the Holy Family in St. Mary's Chapel
Ora et Labora, from a stained glass window of the Holy Family in St. Mary's Chapel

by Gerardo Martinez Cordeiro

 

Anyone familiar with Benedictine spirituality should be acquainted with the phrase ora et labora. This idea is also intrinsic to Jesuit teaching and close to the heart of the Catholic Church at large. The Church understands what Jesus meant 2,000 years ago when he sent out His apostles into the world to share the Good News, and the Church itself is pointless without social outreach. Jesuit spirituality fosters this understanding and expands it to its fullest potential through its social teaching. As a Catholic university, Boston College, develops the desire in its students to serve the community around them. Among many related programs is 4Boston—a group I have had the privilege of being a part of for the last 4 years.

 

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

“They Saw God, and They Ate and Drank”

Last Supper by Simon Ushakov (1685)
Last Supper by Simon Ushakov (1685)

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Exodus 24 is not among the parts of the Bible that most Christians are familiar with. This chapter, however, recounts one of the most important events of the Torah: the ratification of the Mosaic Covenant between God and the people of Israel. For Christians, the story invites a comparison with the Last Supper, where Christ proclaims a New Covenant with all those who believe in Him.

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

Why Catholics Need Poetry

by Adriana Watkins

         

If I had a dollar for every person who doesn’t like poetry, I’d be richer than most poets. I know the pictures in many people’s minds: white-bearded men with quill pens; thirty-year-olds in French berets reading nonsense at an open-mic night; teenagers wearing thick eyeliner and scribbling in notebooks. All of these images are accurate. But there are many kinds of poets, and there is (and should continue to be) another type of person particularly in love with poetry: the Catholic.       

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Wed

30

Jan

2019

A Catholic Response to the Immigration Crisis

"Landscape with the flight into Egypt" by Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1563)
"Landscape with the flight into Egypt" by Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1563)

by Christian Rodriguez

 

Standing atop an outcrop of rocks in Saguaro National Park in Arizona, I could not help but be drawn in by the beauty of the vast expanse before me, with its stunning blue sky and far-reaching desert dotted with seemingly every kind of cacti. Despite its appeal, however, this incredible place hid so much pain and suffering.

 

The Pima County Medical Examiner, which records the deaths of all people in that part of Arizona, recovered the bodies of 2,816 undocumented people in the desert between 2000 and 2017. Given the immensity of the Sonoran Desert, it is not hard to imagine that there are many other people who have yet to be discovered. 

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Wed

12

Dec

2018

“Peace on Earth to People of Goodwill:” The Experience of Faith and the Joy of Christmas

by Tabi Arrey

 

I love the holiday season: the music, the pomp, the cheer, the new Hallmark movies, and even the sweaters and the eggnog. The holiday season might be as cold as anything can be, but hearts are warm as people celebrate one another in ways that are special and particular. We are reminded of the things that matter the most to us; we think of our friends and family, of the people who have influenced our lives in one way or another, of that rather short and obscure action of solicitude and concern that make life worth living. As these memories overload our collective imagination, we see in them the necessity to give back, to give thanks. 

 

We buy and exchange gifts, we go to concerts, and we reorganize our playlists to feature holiday hits, for ‘tis the season to be jolly as the old carol suggests. I love the holiday season, but even more particularly, I love the Christmas Season.

 

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Wed

12

Dec

2018

Lessons on Christmas Eve

by Amanda Judah

 

For the past five years, my mom and I have attended the same Christmas Eve service in Boston. Our friends from our home church are always surprised to hear of this tradition, since it means “church hopping” for a single night. Even more surprisingly, we attend a pageant service for small children, despite not knowing any of these children ourselves. However, I have found that this tradition reminds me of the larger body of Christ, as well as our collective humanity.

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Wed

12

Dec

2018

A Christmas Thought Experiment

by Adriana Watkins

            

A popular method of meditating on the Scriptures is to imagine ourselves as characters in the passage we’re reading. We’ve all been the blind man, or Martha, or Zacchaeus—this exercise reminds us of the reality that Jesus still speaks to us, visits us, and heals us. The Nativity scene, too, has many wonderful perspectives in it, including those of the shepherds and the Magi. Yet, I know plenty of college students who aren’t feeling quite as collected as the shepherds this time of year, or quite as regal as the Magi, and they’re not willing just yet to identify themselves with the cows in the stable.

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