Faith Features

Wed

01

May

2019

No Mercy Without Justice

The Last Judgement by Jehan Bellegambe (1523)
The Last Judgement by Jehan Bellegambe (1523)

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Over the Easter season, we are often reminded of the great beauty of the fact that God chose to have mercy on us. As St. Paul says, “The wages of sin is death.” If God had given us what we really merited, we would all have deserved Hell. “But,” St. Paul continues, “the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus” (Rom. 6:23). Elsewhere, he points out just how merciful God is when he says, “But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom. 5:8).

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Wed

01

May

2019

The Gap in College Healthcare

by Adriana Watkins

 

When I got an awful cold my freshman year, University Health Services provided me with enough cough syrup to start my own pharmacy. When I returned with pinkeye, they gave me antibiotics. When norovirus hit, they shrink-wrapped the food in the dining halls. BC students have generous access to medical care and precautions, but I’m concerned we don’t pay enough attention to the fastest-spreading disease on campus: apathy.

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Wed

01

May

2019

Learning How to Ride My Bike

by Christian Rodriguez

 

When I was little, my parents took me to the park to learn how to ride a bike. They rode theirs so effortlessly and without training wheels! “Wow!” I thought to myself, “How could I do that?” They were having so much fun, and I wanted to join in. It was absolutely thrilling when I started to get the hang of how to ride my bike. That is, until the fear set in: “What if I fall? What if I can’t move in time and hit something? What if I break a bone?” The second that those fears popped into my head, I began to wobble and fall. I hit the ground with a thud and scraped my knee. I called for my parents, who helped clean me off and assured me that I was doing everything right, that I simply forgot to trust in myself.

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Wed

01

May

2019

Faith as a Stronghold

Gasson Hall Chapel
Photo showing the Gasson Hall chapel—instated during the renovations of St. Mary's Hall

by Ejuma Adoga

 

Throughout the course of my time at BC, many people have posed the same questions: “How do you still maintain your faith and keep it going? Why do you still believe?” Every time these questions are asked of me, I find myself giving a variation of the same answer every time. My faith is something that has kept me going in the darkest of times. Yes, I did grow up in a family that held strong Catholic values, but my faith was not truly mine until I came to BC. To this day, however, I still do not know the exact moment when I decided to take my faith and make it my own.

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Wed

01

May

2019

A Lesson in Faith

by Amanda Judah

 

During my semester in Ecuador, I’ve been volunteering in a local elementary school a few mornings a week. The Bible is filled with examples of child-like faith, and so while it might be a bit cliché, getting to know the students has allowed me to reflect spiritually.

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Wed

01

May

2019

Recognizing the Resurrected Lord

Woman, Why Weepest Thou? by Fritz von Uhde
Woman, Why Weepest Thou? by Fritz von Uhde

by Fr. Juan Carlos Rivera, S.J.

 

We just recently entered the most important liturgical season of the year, namely, Easter. During these days we hear the story of Jesus’ apparition to Mary Magdalene in John 20. In this passage we read these words: “Mary stayed outside the tomb weeping.” But why would the Church present to us a weeping Mary Magdalene during a time when we should be rejoicing? Can we make any sense of this for us? Why is Mary weeping? Is she crying out of joy? It doesn’t look like it from what we read. Is she hurt? Or, perhaps, is she weeping because her joy has become grief? 

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Wed

01

May

2019

On Kneeling

by Gerardo Martinez Cordeiro

 

There is a popular tale in Catholic communities that have a devotion to St. Anthony of Padua. The saint once encountered a man who was obstinate in his sinful ways and did not believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. St. Anthony tried to convince the sinner about the Real Presence and to get him to convert. While he was able to get the sinner to doubt, the man was not convinced about the Eucharist, and he developed a test to see if what St. Anthony was saying was actually true. He would starve his donkey for three days, and on the third day he would bring it out and place it between St. Anthony, the Eucharist, and a barrel of oats. If the donkey recognized the presence of Christ and adored it, the man would convert and leave his sinful ways.

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Wed

01

May

2019

Reframing

by Noella D'Souza

 

Earlier this semester, I broke my glasses frames after hitting a dip too aggressively while swing dancing. Thankfully, the new pair I ordered just came in—and I’m obsessed with them. And so, as I turn the page on my old frames (and soon on my junior year), I think now is the perfect time to assess my old prescription, set my vision for the future, and do some general reframing. Here are some things that are on my mind during this transition

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Wed

27

Mar

2019

I Doubt, Therefore I Believe

by Tabi Arrey

 

Can doubt be a useful component in the life of faith? In other words, in an age of rapid technological advancement and skepticism, can doubt be an authentic Christian virtue? At first glance, it seems oxymoronic to have those two words stand next to each other in the same sentence: faith and doubt. Some might argue that within the Christian imagination, these two concepts are mutually exclusive. On the contrary, I would argue for inclusivity, especially because faith necessarily includes elements of doubt.

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Wed

27

Mar

2019

Healing Our Blindness

Christ healing the man born blind, fresco from Dionysiou Monastery, Mount Athos.
Christ healing the man born blind, fresco from Dionysiou Monastery, Mount Athos.

by Christian Rodriguez

 

In the story of the Blind Man at Bethsaida (Mark 8:22-26) we hear of a man who is brought before Jesus to be healed. Jesus puts his saliva on the man’s eyes. Yet, the man isn’t completely healed. He is still blind: “I can see people, but they look like trees, walking.” Jesus gives it another shot and the man is completely healed. For this man, his journey of healing was also a journey of faith.

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