Faith Features

Wed

22

Feb

2017

“The Beginning of Devotion”

 

 

 

by Libbie Steiner

 

 

“Attention is the beginning of devotion.” In a perfectly distilled phrase of just six words, poet Mary Oliver commanded my consideration. I wasn’t exactly sure what it meant, but I knew that I wanted to know. I knew that it was significant and truthful. There was something about it that made me want to let the words sink into my soul.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

On Lent and Ascesis

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

With Lent approaching fast, it is perhaps particularly important to give some thought to the topic of fasting and—more importantly—ascesis. The Church from Her earliest days—as is evident from the Didache—has prescribed particular days and times when one is expected to fast. Why is it that we fast, what is the point of it and what is its benefit?

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What is Faith?

 

 

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Earlier this month Father Greg Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries and author of Tattoos on the Heart, spoke at BC. Of all of the wise things he said, it was one of his responses during the Q&A that hit me the hardest. Someone asked him what role faith plays in the recovery and integration of gang members at Homeboy, and he responded first with another question: “what is faith?”

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What Are We Marching For?

 

by Katie Daniels

 

It’s a cold and sunny day in late January and the city is flooded with people. Hundreds of thousands of women and men, many wearing pink hats and carrying pink signs, march in peaceful protest through the streets. Young moms push strollers, church groups sing hymns, and students snap pictures of the crowds. Even though many of the marchers have traveled a long way to be here, everyone is cheerful and courteous, excited to be standing in solidarity for a common cause.

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Lo, How A Rose E’er Blooming

 

 

by Libbie Steiner

 

The first time I heard the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe, I was sixteen years old. I was in Woodburn, Oregon, sitting in a meeting hall of Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (United Treeplanters and Farmworkers of the Northwest), a union for farmworkers. The walls were decorated in colorful murals depicting farmworkers, children, and giants of the farmworker justice movement, including César Chávez, a champion of workers’ and civil rights in California. Some of the people depicted in the murals held signs that read, “¡Respeto y sueldo justo para los campesinos!” and “No somos ilegales. Somos trabajadores” (“Respect and a just salary for farmworkers!” and “We are not illegals. We are workers”). In the mural, an elder held an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and the leader gestured to it as he told the story.  

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Imago Dei

 

 

by Laura McLaughlin

 

Ever since Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden, God has hidden himself from humanity. This has led humanity to resort to its own devices to portray God. At first glance it seems that this poses a great challenge: instead of God being available to us and knowable, He seems remote and inaccessible. We quickly learn that the image of an old man with a long beard that we had a child is inadequate to say the least. 

 

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

“Are You the One Who Is to Come, or Should We Look for Another?”

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

I find the Gospel reading for Gaudete Sunday to be particularly fascinating. If you follow along in Matthew’s gospel, Jesus is proclaimed to be the Son of God by John the Baptist in Matthew 3 and—after fasting for forty days—begins His public ministry by preaching and performing miracles. By Matthew 11, Jesus is reported to have performed dozens of miracles and—doubtless—there was much talk about the new traveling and healing teacher in Israel. On the other hand, things were not exactly looking up for John. While Jesus tended to the crowds, John languished in prison.

 

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Tue

15

Nov

2016

Work and Pray

 

by Libbie Steiner

 

This past weekend I attended my fourth Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice (IFTJ) in Washington, D.C. The IFTJ is a gathering of students, campus ministers, Jesuit Volunteers, parishioners, and other people connected to Jesuit institutions across the country. It is a time of learning, praying, and advocating for social justice. The IFTJ is always one of the highlights of my fall semester, and this one was no exception. Speakers like Fr. Greg Boyle, S.J., Sr. Norma Pimentel, M.J., and Lisa Sharon Harper inspired me to speak truth to power. In breakout sessions on everything from questioning the morality of Just War Theory to examining how to write about politics and faith in a polarized world, I learned how some people are applying Catholic social teaching and Jesuit ideals in challenging times. After spending the weekend with nearly 2,000 people who care deeply about “a faith that does justice,” my hope was renewed after a week where I wasn’t able to find much hope. 

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