Culture

Tue

25

Apr

2017

The Promise: Movie Review

by Armen Grigorian

 

The Promise, a film directed by Terry George and starring Oscar Isaac, Charlotte Le Bon, and Christian Bale, is a love story set during the onset of the Armenian Genocide. Michael Begosian (Oscar Isaac), is an Armenian medical student in Istanbul who falls in love with Ana Khesarian, (Charlotte Le Bon). Khesarian, however, is already in a relationship with Christopher Meyers (Christian Bale), a renowned American journalist. Much of the movie’s plot is driven by this love triangle, but the film also does not shy away from addressing the Armenian Genocide.

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Tue

25

Apr

2017

The Theology of Chance the Rapper

by Annalise Deal

 

Like many of my fellow millennials, in the last several months I’ve become obsessed with Chance the Rappers newest album, Coloring Book. I’m not typically much of a rap person, but I am a Theology major, so a friend of mine recommended the album because he thought I would be interested in the lyrical themes of the album. He was absolutely right. I have been fascinated by the way that Chance combines more typical rap themes (“Drinking All Night”) with his deep Christian faith. Chance has discussed his faith extensively in interviews, and was very public about it at the 2017 Grammys as well, where performed segments of “How Great” and “All We Got” complete with a gospel choir, and began his acceptance speech for Best New Artist with this simple invocation “Glory be to God.”

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Tue

25

Apr

2017

Call Me Francis

by Eileen Corkery

 

This past month, Netflix released a four-part biographical miniseries chronicling the life Pope Francis. Produced by filmmaker Pietro Valsecchi, Call Me Francis was adapted from the critically acclaimed 2015 Italian film Chiamatemi Francesco. Grossing nearly € 3.5 million, the film ranked second in the Italian box office its opening weekend. In 2016, Netflix bought the rights to the film and reworked it into four 50-minute episodes.

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Wed

29

Mar

2017

Film Review: Jackie

by Hadley Hustead

 

Last year Jackie, a movie written by Noah Oppenheim and directed by Pablo Larraín, gave Americans a view of Jackie Kennedy’s grief and resilience in the aftermath of her husband’s assassination. Natalie Portman’s raw portrayal of Mrs. Kennedy asks the viewers to contemplate how she managed to survive the days following JFK’s death with unspeakable grace and courage. The film’s spine-chilling score and jolting scene shifts leave viewers anxious but enchanted.

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Wed

29

Mar

2017

How Lent is Celebrated Around the World

by Armen Grigorian

 

When you think of the Lenten season in the United States, a few traditions come to mind: Not eating meat on Fridays, giving something up, or even doing something extra as a reminder that this is a holy time of year. While these traditions are all very familiar to us here in the U.S., all over the world, different people and different cultures are observing Lent in their own ways.

 

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Wed

29

Mar

2017

Snow Days: Is Leisure a Virtue?

by Eileen Corkery

 

“BC Weather Alert. Because of the storm forecast, Boston College will be closed tomorrow, March 14th.” A little after 10:30pm, screams and cheers echoed across Upper Campus as students received the coveted snow day text from the Office of Emergency Management. Homework was thrown aside and quickly forgotten in the Cheverus Hall lounge. In Kostka Hall, freshman girls danced in the hallway. Meanwhile on Lower Campus, celebrations commenced in the mods.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What Neil Gorsuch Could Mean for the Supreme Court

 

by Armen Grigorian

 

On January 31, 2017, President Donald J. Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch, a judge of the United State Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit to be the next member of United States Supreme Court. He was nominated to this position by President George W. Bush and has been serving in this role since 2006. Jude Gorsuch’s’ nomination is to fill the seat left vacant by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia last year. Since Justice Scalia’s passing there have been eight members sitting on the Supreme Court, four of which tend to have a more conservative approach to interpreting the Constitution, and four of which have a more liberal approach to interpreting it. This breakdown of the Supreme Court hold particular significance due to the fact that a 4-4 tie when the justices vote on a case means that the holding of the lower court gets upheld and no precedent is set. This rule has impacted multiple cases since the death of Justice Scalia, and has held up multiple rulings. Judge Gorsuch’s potential impact on the Supreme Court is quite substantial as his vote may be the deciding one on multiple cases.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Moonlight: A Review

 

by Niyobuhungiro Godfroid

 

Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight tells the story of a young boy as he struggles with questions of identity and life in Miami’s ghettos. The film and the story stay away from gruesome depictions of the inner city and instead focus on the psychological experience of its main character Chiron. Outwardly, it is a story about a gay black male dealing with issues of sexuality, identity, and manhood. At its core, however, it is a work clearly concerned with a universal feeling of loss and rejection. Throughout the film’s three acts the audience is placed in Chiron’s shoes and sees both the beauty and pains of his life, the audience comes to deeply empathize with a character whose specific circumstances are singular but whose mental and emotional life feel universal.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

The Fate of Fr. Rodrigues and the Mission to Japan [Spoilers]

 

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

Almost all of my friends who watched Silence before me left the movie with some big questions regarding the ending, so when I first watched it, I had already formed the opinion that I needed to pay close attention to what went on, especially toward the end of the movie. Those who have seen the movie know that the ending, is deeply unsettling, because it seems that ultimately, after watching so many instances of heroic faith, the solution proposed is to feign apostacy and hope for the best.

 

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

My Architect: A Son’s Journey

by Laura McLaughlin

 

A son loses the father he never really knew and, years later, goes on a quest to know his father through them. He documents his journeys across the globe as he visits his architect father’s buildings, former colleagues and lovers, and his half siblings. Nathaniel Kahn’s film, My Architect: A Son’s Journey, is not so much about the iconic buildings designed by his father Louis Kahn as it is about relationships, family, life and love.

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Why Do We Care So Much About Black Friday?

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

For many, the idea of Black Friday brings a feeling of excitement. Sales, savings, door busters, and discounts excite millions across the country. However, for a growing number of Americans, the thought of Black Friday brings with it thoughts of disgust.  Long lines, stores opening on Thanksgiving, and businesses taking advantage of consumers are just some of the complaints that people have about Black Friday. Despite the debate, retailers continue to make billions of dollars in one day, and customers continue to flock to their stores. 

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Advent: It’s Lit

by Eileen Corkery

 

“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” In the Christian tradition, light is a symbol of God. It has come to represent hope in the face of despair and clarity in the face of confusion. However, what is it about light that is so captivating to humans? From contraband twinkly lights in dorm rooms, to bonfires on the beach, to flickering candlelit dinners, people are continually enchanted by light. 

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Tue

15

Nov

2016

Walking Dead and the Ressurection

by Lucas LaRoche

 

Fans were stunned to see the recent season premiere of AMC’s Walking Dead. I must admit that I’ve fallen out of the loop with the show, but the show’s portrayal of the darker side of humanity interests us in our glass towers, matching our disinterest with nihilism.

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Tue

15

Nov

2016

The Six Weeks of Christmas

by Adriana Watkins

 

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas—and if it feels like it was just beginning to look a lot like Halloween, that’s because it was only three weeks ago. But, like it or not, the tidal waves of red and green have begun to roll in. You may be ecstatic, or you may be making a feeble attempt to “at least celebrate Thanksgiving first” as you decorate your room with turkeys instead of colored lights. Either way, you’re bound to find Christmas around every corner, and it begs the question: Is there a right time to get into the holiday spirit?

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Tue

15

Nov

2016

“Religion of Sports” by Tom Brady Set to Air

by Armen Grigorian

 

On November 15, a new TV show, “Religion of Sports,” aired on the Audience Network. The show is produced by Tom Brady, Michael Strahan, and Gotham Chopra, the son of famous spirituality guru Deepak Chopra. The series will consist of six hour-long episodes that will each explore an example of the ways in which sports impact the cultural and spiritual aspects of religions around the world. According to The Boston Herald, the show explores the rivalry between soccer clubs in Glasgow, Scotland; the Calgary Stampede rodeo in Alberta, Canada; and the rise of "e-sports." It will also delve into NASCAR, mixed martial arts, and minor league baseball.

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Tue

25

Oct

2016

New Film Portrays the Life of St. Ignatius

by Laura McLaughlin

 

The independent film Ignacio de Loyola tells the story of Saint Ignatius of Loyola from his time as a young soldier to his conversion, delving into his personality and spiritual struggles. The film begins with a brash young Ignatius striving for fame on the battlefield and for recognition from the princess of the royal family. In a panel discussion on Boston College’s campus, director Paolo Dy explained that one goal of the film was to “bring Ignatius down from the altar,” to put “flesh on the myth” and understand his colorful early life.

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Tue

25

Oct

2016

Election Circumstances Create Difficult Decisions for Catholic Voters

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

This year’s presidential race has proven to be one of the most extraordinary elections in recent memory. For many of us, this is the first election in which we can vote. Voting allows the public to lend their voice in the political realm. Yet many people are not thrilled at the prospects of this year’s candidates for president. Catholic voters beg the question, “How should I vote as a Catholic?”

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Tue

25

Oct

2016

Pros or Priesthood: An Interview with BC’s Quarterback Patrick Towles

by Armin Grigorian

 

 

"[God] gave me the ability to play so I think it’s my responsibility to play as well as I can. I think, and I disagree with this, a lot of people say God is a big part of their lives, but that sells Him short. I think God is not just a part of their lives but is a part of everything. Everything you do, He’s there somewhere."

-Patrick Towles

 

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Tue

27

Sep

2016

Rinaldi Book Honors the Legacy of Welles Crowther

by Eileen Corkery

 

 

 

This past month marked the 15th anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001. 22 Boston College alumni were killed in the attacks on that day, including 24-year-old Welles Crowther. Boston College honors those who were lost through the memorial labyrinth, located behind Bapst Library; however, the university also pays special tribute annually to the legacy Crowther, known to many as “the Man in the Red Bandana.” Recently, ESPN reporter Tom Rinaldi published a book highlighting Welles’s story, The Red Bandanna: A Life. A Choice. A Legacy.

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Tue

27

Sep

2016

Twenty One Pilots and the Flight from Responsibility

by Adriana Watkins

 

If you’ve turned on your radio more than once this year, you may be a little sick of “Ride.” You’ve probably also heard your fair share of friends belting the chorus of “Stressed Out,” and the pop music culture in general seems to have taken up a policy of Twenty One Pilots, Twenty One Thousand Times a Day. What exactly attracts so many listeners to this band? The music is catchy, sure, but plenty of music is catchy. There must be something in the lyrics that draws us in, and the more I listen to these songs, the more I think the draw runs deeper than the buzz of a few overplayed songs.

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Tue

27

Sep

2016

Why We All Can’t Stop Singing Along to “Hamilton”

by Armen Grigorian

 

I’m sure almost all of you have either heard the soundtrack to the hit Broadway musical, “Hamilton,” or at least heard about the musical itself. The musical about the life of Alexander Hamilton, America’s first Secretary of the Treasury, with music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, opened in August 2015 on Broadway. Since then Hamilton has grown to become one of the most successful musicals of all time. The popularity of the musical has only slightly decreased since its opening, and most people still can’t get tickets. This begs the question, what makes this musical so popular? Everyone had heard of Alexander Hamilton, but until the musical came out, most people did not give him a second thought, except when they took out a ten-dollar bill to pay for lunch. Now, it’s difficult to find someone who doesn’t say that Hamilton is their favorite Founding Father.

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Tue

26

Apr

2016

“The Unfolding of A Promise:” A Step in the Right Direction

by Andrew Lizon

 

 

Recently I attended a workshop entitled “The Unfolding of A Promise.” It was presented and facilitated by Sister Annetta Heeran, FMSA, a kindly and elderly nun who’s Irish accent made the workshop ever more enjoyable. The workshop itself was held in what seemed to be the basement of the Carmelite Monastery, parallel to the Boston College’s School of Theology and Ministry. And although the program was open to the public, it was attended entirely by religious persons, all of whom were very polite and somewhat elderly. In spite of all these curious details, the workshop had a fairly serious note: to understand our role in the universe by tracing the inception of life from the Big Bang to our current condition. I have to admit that I was interested to see how we were to endeavor such a task.

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Tue

26

Apr

2016

Zootopia’s Message to Never Give Up (Spoiler Alert)

by Bianca Passero

 

 

Pixar’s newest animated film, Zootopia, focuses on the life of a female bunny named Judy who wants to be a cop. She is discouraged by all of those around her, included her parents, to follow her dream of being a cop because “she is just a bunny.” She decides to prove everyone wrong and go to the police academy anyway to fulfill her dream of being a cop. When she first gets there she struggles with the physical training, like climbing ice walls and completing obstacle courses. This just pushes Judy to try even harder, and she trains by herself early in the morning and late at night. All of the hard work pays off because she ends up graduating the police academy at the top of her class and is assigned to work in Zootopia-a city where “anyone can be anything.”

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Tue

26

Apr

2016

A Brief Point on God’s Not Dead

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

When I found out that a second installation of God’s Not Dead was due to be released, I was less than enthusiastic. The plot for the new movie revolves around a teacher, who was asked a question in class about Jesus and incorporated Scripture into her answer. This lands her in a trial which considers whether she acted against the law in presenting a religious text as evidence. At some point, the legal proceedings turn into a debate about the reliability of Scripture, however, as the prosecutor seems to argue that Jesus never existed, a position to which even the most skeptical scriptural scholars do not seem to cling fast. That is not to say that there are no people out there who believe in such nonsense, but merely that most serious scholars on both sides of the issue of the Divinity of Jesus would be quick to disavow them.

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Wed

30

Mar

2016

Is God Anywhere to be Found in House of Cards? (Spoiler Alert)

by Francis Adams

 

As the newest season of Netflix’s hit show House of Cards has come and almost surely gone now for most—those of us, that is, who have become accustomed to letting this mysterious force come and conquer two days of our lives each year—I deem it important to pause and reflect upon what has just happened to us.

 

 

In my case, this kind of reflection was prompted by a fortuitous occurrence. While interning last year at a literary agency in Union Square, Manhattan, I popped into St. Francis Xavier Church on West 16th Street on a random Thursday and met one of the writers of the show, a Jesuit priest by the name of Bill Cain.  He is an amazingly friendly person who came up to me and introduced himself as I sat alone in a pew. We got to talking; he told me he was a writer; I asked him what he’d written; he responded by listing off several Broadway plays, network TV shows, and then—the jaw-dropper—House of Cards. I was a bit star-struck, and blurted out something to the effect of, “Woah, cool! I love that show!” He shrugged it off, though, and appeared reluctant to talk about it. I asked him later about this and he said that he had actually quit writing for Netflix because they were cutting out much of his material, and that, “Nobody is doing any real seeking on that show.” Now, at this point I had gotten to know him pretty well, and it surprised me that a man of such impish wit and penchant for provocation (his controversial ABC show, Nothing Sacred, pails in comparison to some of his homilies); a Jesuit, in other words, who pushes the “God in all things” maxim to a point beyond which many of us are comfortable, would say something so univocal and absolute.

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Wed

30

Mar

2016

It is Nacho Place to Comment: The Superbowl Commercial that got America talking

by Bianca Passero

 

 

This year, because my beloved Giants weren’t in the Superbowl, I found myself not very interested in the “big game.” I found myself doing work when the actual game was on and only watching the television when the commercials aired. While I was waiting for Budweiser’s annual commercial with a puppy and/or a horse to come on, a commercial for Dorito’s caught my, and America’s, eyes.

 

 

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Tue

23

Feb

2016

In Defense of #BachelorNation

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Shameless confession: I am obsessed with The Bachelor. In the past  seven years since the good ole’ days of Jillian Harris and Jake Pavelka, I’ve watched countless relationships form in the admittedly absurd conditions of the show, and then 90% of them breakup within a year of their season ending. I will admit it is an absurd premise that can hardly be considered reality television: a single man or woman dating 25 people in hopes of finding a spouse. There is a lot of alcohol, a lot of helicopters, and a lot of making out. I won’t try to defend the show on moral grounds (although I do believe there are always a few truly good people in the contestant pool) but the reason I keep coming back to watch is the same I think as most fans: The Bachelor does have a strange way of bringing people together. In fact our collective fandom is so strong that we even have a hashtag: the beloved #BachelorNation.

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Tue

23

Feb

2016

The Problem of Justice in Netflix’s “Making a Murderer”

by Francis Adams

 

 

(SPOILER ALERT)

One of the most talked-about shows at the moment is the Netflix documentary series, Making a Murderer, which tells the story of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who served 18 years in prison for a wrongful rape conviction. Two years after eventually being found innocent and released from prison, he was arrested and charged with the murder of 25 year-old photographer, Teresa Halbach. The show is riveting from the beginning, as it continually demands that the audience throws away its certitude from one moment to the next as new information is revealed. We are gradually exposed to a criminal justice system that wrongfully imprisoned Avery—effectively stealing eighteen years of his life—and to the possibility that the very same thing might be happening again, as the evidence implicating Avery in the murder—which at first seemed incontrovertible—begins to come into question. As the case unfolds, it seems more and more plausible that certain key pieces of evidence could even have been planted to frame Avery by the same law enforcement that wrongfully convicted him twenty years ago.

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Tue

23

Feb

2016

On Fiction: A Brief Note on “Flatline”

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Tue

26

Jan

2016

The Value of Work and Community in The Martian

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Matt Damon’s most recent performance in The Martian is markedly different from other space exploration films, while still pretty unrealistic and dramatic, it is hilarious and surprisingly philosophical. One major reason for this, I think, is that for the most part the movie takes place on Mars, which is a desolate planet, but with a recognizably Earth-like landscape. When Mark Watney is left behind by his mission, the stage is set: a single person, alone on a new planet, left to cultivate the land in order to survive. I could not help but notice that the situation resembles a darker retelling of Genesis 2:15 “The LORD took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to till it and to keep it.”

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Tue

26

Jan

2016

Aziz Ansari’s Master of None Asks Big Questions

by Francis Adams

 

 

As someone previously unfamiliar with Aziz Ansari—known primarily for his role as Tom Haverford on the hit NBC show Parks and Recreation—I was pleasantly surprised to stumble across his new Netflix series, Master of None. I found on one hand a brilliant comedian, and on the other, an artist whose bold, creative vision is  unique in so many ways. The show centers on Ansari’s semi-autobiographical character, Dev, and his foibles in navigating the strange territory of being single in New York and in being an aspiring actor whose identity as an Indian man complicates his avowed pursuit for “that David Schwimmer money”.

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Wed

09

Dec

2015

Spotlight Captures Deep Catholic Faith of Boston Amidst Crisis

by Annalise Deal

 

Spotlight, which tells the story of the four Boston Globe reporters who first investigated the sexual abuse scandal in Boston in 2001, premiered last week, and immediately received much critical acclaim both locally and nationally. The film treats the extremely sensitive issue of the sexual abuse scandals from a unique angle: that of reporters who were eager but hesitant to realize just how large and pervasive the problem was.

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Wed

09

Dec

2015

Racism and Policing

by Mary Kate Cahill

 

I come from Chicago where, if you’ve been watching the news, you’ll know that a story recently broke of a police shooting of a black man. Officer Jason Van Dyke was caught on a police dash-cam shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, a car robbery suspect. Van Dyke shot McDonald and he fell to the ground; Van Dyke then proceeded to empty his clip into the wounded McDonald, shooting him 16 times in all. McDonald was walking away from the police when he was shot.

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Tue

17

Nov

2015

9 Things on Which Justin Bieber and Jesus Agree

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Justin Bieber’s comeback has been unique; perhaps most famously for his inclusion of his faith as a now-guiding principle in his public appearances and songs. After falling from his sweet innocence into public shame the past couple years, this turn is somewhat surprising. Nonetheless, Justin is a self-proclaimed Christian saying, “I just wanna honestly live like Jesus.” So, without out further ado, here are some nuggets from Purpose that track his progress:

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Tue

17

Nov

2015

Steve Jobs and Forgiveness

by Armen Grigorian

 

Since his death in 2011, people have been unsure what exactly to think of Steve Jobs. Many remember him for changing the world with his revolutionary products, such as the iPhone and the iPad, and even go as far as saying that he was the Thomas Edison of our time. Despite this praise, there are many others that are highly critical of Jobs, saying he was impossible to work with, mistreated those around him, and cared for no one. The recently released biopic movie Steve Jobs explores this troubled, personal, side of Jobs while placing particular emphasis on what people are perhaps most critical of Jobs for: his treatment of his daughter.

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Tue

27

Oct

2015

Why God Loves Baseball

by Mary Kate Cahill

 

Last night I was scrolling through my Facebook feed when I came upon an update from a page I follow, the Navin Field Grounds Crew. The page is run by a group of volunteers who give their time to maintain a baseball field at the site of Tiger Stadium (originally called Navin Field), the Detroit Tigers’ baseball park from 1912 to 1999. Tiger Stadium and Fenway Park opened on the same day in 1912, but Tiger Stadium met an early demise when the Tigers moved to Comerica Park in 2000; the city demolished the stadium several years later, but the grass field remains. The Navin Field Grounds Crew cuts the grass, chalks the foul lines, and always leaves out a ball and bat for any visitors who might come hoping to play.

 

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Tue

27

Oct

2015

Getting by with a Little Help from Our Friends

by Annalise Deal

 

I was recently on a retreat where Christian author and international missionary Dan Bauman gave a talk, which he opened with: “one of my favorite things about God is that he lets us do life with our friends.” His point was that the only reason we got to spend that weekend on retreat with friends was because we believe that walking through life in community is what God desires for us. It doesn’t seem that radical of a concept, but it is a phenomenally important one.

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Tue

27

Oct

2015

Madam Secretary

by Eileen Corkery

 

CBS’s Madam Secretary is a fresh take at a primetime, political drama television series. Produced by Morgan Freeman and Lori McCreary, the show is in its second season and stars Téa Leoni as Elizabeth McCord, a mother of three and former CIA analyst, who is unexpectedly appointed United States Secretary of State. Tim Daly stars as Elizabeth’s husband, Henry, a theology professor at Georgetown University, who has been recently redrafted as an undercover operative at the National Security Agency. Elizabeth and Henry are forced to balance parenthood with their professional commitments to national security.

 

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

The Virtue of Horror Movies

by Ethan Mack

 

If you asked people on campus about how the Jesuits have influenced them during their time at Boston College, you would probably get a variety of answers. Some would surely say the Jesuits taught them the importance of service. Others would say the Jesuits showed them how to think well. And others still would claim the Jesuits demonstrated to them the richness of Catholicism. However, I'm probably the only one who can say the influence of a Jesuit made me interested in horror films. A certain Jesuit (who will remain anonymous...but if you know the Jesuit Community at all, you can probably guess) shared with me his love of horror films early on during my time at BC. Watching horror films is now one of my favorite activities when with a group of friends. However, there are some who fail to see the virtue of films in this genre. Thus, I would like to explain what makes these films unique.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Inside Out and the Importance of Suffering

by Annalise Deal

 

Upon watching Disney-Pixar’s newest hit Inside Out this summer, I found myself overcome by the feeling that the producers of this film had portrayed my own experience of consciousness more accurately than any other fictional thing I have watched or read. I left the theater unable to exactly articulate why it seemed so accurate, but upon further reflection I think it was the development of the character of Sadness that led the the film’s overall profundity.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Faith and Comedy

by Laura McLaughlin

 

Catholic comedian Jim Gaffigan is now the star of his own TV series, The Jim Gaffigan Show, which is largely based on his life and even includes one of his sons in the cast of children. Gaffigan is able to create comedy out of the everyday stuff of life- food, family outings, food, child rearing, food, religion, and food- in spectacular fashion. Both in reality and in the show, he and his wife, Jeannie, live in a two-bedroom apartment in Manhattan with their five children. Much of his humor is centered around his struggle as a lazy, gluttonous father of five, thankfully supported by his “wonder-woman” wife who has given birth to all of her children at home. He paraphrases people’s reactions to his lifestyle with a patronizing, “Well that’s one way to live your life.”

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Tue

24

Feb

2015

What it Means to be ‘Christian’ in Political America

by Katie Rich

 

Earlier this week, Wisconsin governor and 2016 GOP hopeful Scott Walker came under fire for claiming he does not know if President Obama is a Christian.  His answer seemed to deflect the question at hand, spiraling into a series of defensive remarks, as reported by the Washington Post: “‘I’ve actually never talked about it or I haven’t read about that,’ Walker said, his voice calm and firm. ‘I’ve never asked him that,’ he added. ‘You’ve asked me to make statements about people that I haven’t had a conversation with about that. How [could] I say if I know either of you are a Christian?’”

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Fri

31

Oct

2014

Pro/Con: On the Ordination of Women to the Priesthood



The topic of women's ordination has been highly contested in recent decades.  Although Pope Saint John Paul II issued Ordinatio Sacerdotalis in 1994 and gave the Catholic Church's final word on the matter, the debate

continues today among Christians of all denominations.  Here, Annalise Deal, an Episcopalian, writes in favor of the practice. Gjergji Evangjeli, who is Greek Orthodox, writes against it.


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Fri

04

Jul

2014

America's Catholic Founding Fathers

by Chris Canniff

Chris is Editor-in-Chief Emeritus and a Senior Staff Columnist.

 

In the summer of 1776, fifty-six noble statesmen dipped their quills into iron gall ink and declared the peoples of this nation to be free. Unsurprisingly, only one of the signers was a Catholic, Maryland’s Charles Carroll.

 

Born into an aristocratic plantation family, Charles Carroll was not initially interested in politics, and civil law barred him from public office anyway because of his Roman Catholic faith. Nevertheless, he and his family were powerful and prominent people in the colonies because of their immense wealth.


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Mon

16

Dec

2013

Torch Columnists Swap Zucchettos with Pope Francis

Katie Rich and Ethan Mack
Katie Rich and Ethan Mack

by Chris Canniff

Chris is Editor-in-Chief and a Senior Staff Columnist.

 

On Wednesday, December 11, two of The Torch’s senior staff columnists who have been studying abroad in Rome this semester had an amazing encounter with Pope Francis.

 

Each Wednesday, the Holy Father holds a general audience in St. Peter’s Square. The night before, Ethan Mack and Katie Rich, both A&S ’15, went to a clerical clothing store and purchased a white zucchetto in Francis’ size to give to him. On Wednesday morning, they arrived in St. Peter’s Square early so that they could position themselves right up along the barricades, near where the popemobile would drive by. Inside the zucchetto, they had placed a note which read, “Boston College loves our Jesuit pope!”

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Sat

09

Nov

2013

No Christ Without the Cross

by Mark Hertenstein

Mark is a Senior Staff Columnist; he writes our monthly "Protestant Perspective" column.

 

One of the things I detest the most is hearing from Christians that “God meets me where I am.” To quote Joel Osteen, who builds entire sermons and a corporate message of health-wealth gospel in his books (not unlike the indulgence sellers of old), “You are accepted by God.” Yes, he confirmed that he means everyone in a later interview.

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Thu

07

Nov

2013

Please Consider Donating to the Military Archdiocese

by Ethan Mack

Ethan is Executive Editor and a Senior Staff Columnist.

 

This Sunday, November 10, there will be a national collection held for the Archdiocese for the Military Services. The Archdiocese for the Military Services (AMS) is a Catholic diocese established in 1985 by Pope John Paul II. Its mission is to tend to the pastoral needs of Catholic men and women in the military and provide them with the sacraments. AMS sponsors all Catholic chaplains in the military and aids them in providing these essential services to those in uniform throughout the world.

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Fri

11

Oct

2013

The Protestant Perspective on Lumen Fidei

by Mark Hertenstein

Mark is a Senior Staff Columnist; he writes our monthly "Protestant Perspective" column.

 

As a Protestant, and especially as a Lutheran, I was excited about the prospect of an encyclical from the papacy on faith. Part of me wanted to see what the papacy, after centuries of dogging the Reformers, would say on the Reformers’ primary concern, and indeed if it would reflect what Martin Luther had said all along. Part of me cringed for fear that should it not be done properly (read: the pope goes against current thought and scholarship about the issue of faith on both sides), it would perpetuate a division that should not exist between the two sides.

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