Catholicism 101

Sun

17

Dec

2017

Opportunities for Giving at BC

by Amanda Judah

 

Christmas is often termed the “season of giving”. Charitable organizations use this time to launch campaigns related to the season, encouraging the public to think of resources they can share. Recently, this goodwill has extended as early in the year as “Giving Tuesday”, a social media phenomenon that occurs the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Salvation Army bell-ringers are ubiquitous outside of grocery stores and malls, and there are many opportunities to volunteer or donate. Boston College is no exception, encouraging students to participate in several ways to contribute to the overall community:

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Sun

17

Dec

2017

O Wisdom: Advent Antiphons

by Natasha Zinos

 

 

Among the Church’s lesser known Advent traditions are the O Antiphons. Prayed during evening prayer from December 17th to the 23rd, these antiphons highlight Old Testament hopes for the Messiah. Accompanying the Magnificat which is prayed on these same evenings, the O Antiphons bear a strong resemblance to the Virgin Mary’s praise of God for sending his Messiah into the world through her.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Faith in Action: Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice

by Vanessa Ruiz-Wiarco

 

Before I attended the Ignatian Family Teach-In in Washington D.C., I had never given much thought as to how my Catholic faith reinforces the idea of social justice. There has always been the incessant teachings of our parents or school teachers who remind us to “Do unto others what you would have them do unto you,” but the application of this principle is more complex than the Church, or even the United States government, has taught me it could be. The Teach-In allowed me to analyze Scripture and apply the teachings to the social issues of immigration and mass incarceration and how they should be tackled through a Jesuit Catholic approach.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Friendship: What, Why, and How

 

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm & Adriana Watkins

 

“Friendship,” C. S. Lewis writes. “Is born at the moment when one man says to another, What! You too? I thought that no one but myself…

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

The Sin Of Sexual Harassment

by Annalise Deal

 

In the last couple months, allegations of sexual harassment and assault have dominated the news, from Hollywood to Washington. However, the recent accusations against U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore have led to some difference of opinion among some Christians. Judge Moore has been accused by several women of making sexual advances on them when they were teenagers in the 1970’s and he was a 30-something local politician. Two of the women, Leigh Corfman and Beverly Nelson, have said that Moore sexually assaulted them. In the wake of these accusations, Alabama State Auditor Jim Ziegler attempted to defend Moore by noting that he did not attempt or engage in sexual intercourse with the women, and by using the Bible to defend the ages of the women at the time of the incidences. Ziegler told the Washington Examiner “Take the Bible…. [T]ake Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus.” This argument is problematic from a Catholic perspective for two reasons: because it misrepresents the relationships between the Holy Family, and because it assumes nothing harmful about Moore’s relationship with and assault of teenage girls.

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Thu

26

Oct

2017

95 Theses Turn 500

 

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

In the early morning of October 31, 1517, one brave man nailed 95 arguments to a church door, and the world was never the same again—or so the story goes. The truth of the legend surrounding Martin Luther’s 95 Theses notwithstanding, it is hard to dispute the world changing effect that this German monk would have. Luther is often given credit for beginning the Protestant Reformation with his 95 Theses in 1517, and a commonly cited ending is the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, although theological disputes, dialogues, and divisions continue to the present day.

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Thu

26

Oct

2017

Magnum Principium and the New Liturgical Translation

 

by Ethan Starr

 

In response to the Second Vatican Convention’s goal of increased utilization of vernacular languages in the liturgy, the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) released its first English translation of the Roman Missal in 1973. In keeping with Vatican instruction of the time, the inexact translation sought a “dynamic equivalence” to the original Latin, attempting to adhere to the spirit of the Latin texts without a concern for absolute literality. In its intention of avoiding the sometimes unwieldy, technical language of a literal translation, the ICEL did not always win the approval Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Rome’s regulatory arm concerning liturgical translations. The Congregation’s rejection of a revised 1998 translation by the ICEL sent the clear message to the loose translations that the Congregation was not partial to dynamic equivalence. In 2002, The Congregation for Divine Worship released the instruction Liturgiam Authenticam, which mandated that "the original text, insofar as possible, must be translated integrally and in the most exact manner” to the original Missal. The most recent English translation of the Roman Missal, in accordance with the rigidity of the “formal equivalence” method ordered by Liturgiam Authenticam, was approved by the Holy See in 2010 and adopted by most English-speaking countries by the end of 2011.

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Thu

26

Oct

2017

Exorcism and Spiritual Warfare 101

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

“BATHSHEBA! By the power of God, I condemn you back to hell!” For anyone who has dared to watch The Conjuring, these were words used to cast out a demon. If only it were that simple. We do not know a whole lot about exorcisms. The Catholic Church says that exorcisms exist, but other than that, scant information is available. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says, “When the Church asks publicly and authoritatively in the name of Jesus Christ that a person or object be protected against the power of the Evil One and withdrawn from his dominion, it is called exorcism” (CCC 1673).

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