Wed

26

Sep

2018

McCarrick Scandal Comes to Light; Church Leaders Implicated

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

This summer, news that Theodore McCarrick was a long-time sexual predator broke, prompting his resignation from the College of Cardinals. The reports of abuse include massaging seminarians, sharing beds with young priests, and abusing young boys. McCarrick would often invite small groups of seminaries over for drinks, and then assign the seminarians sleeping arrangements—including assigning one to sleep with him. In addition to sexual abuse, he groomed young priests and encourage them to climb the hierarchy. These seminarians and priests felt helpless to speak up about any of the situations. 

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

St. John's Seminary Investigated for Alleged Misdeeds

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Amid the scandals of Archbishop McCarrick coming to light, especially his conduct regarding seminarians, another revelation rocked the Archdiocese of Boston regarding St. John’s Seminary. In an article dated August 1, John Monaco, a former seminarian at St. John’s, recounted his experiences at a minor seminary in Ohio as well as his two years at St. John’s in an article which appeared in OnePeterFive

 

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

States Follow Pennsylvania in Investigating Dioceses

by Jack Long

 

A Grand Jury report in Pennsylvania exposed more than three hundred sexually abusive priests, who abused upwards of one thousand children. Following that example, the attorneys general of Illinois, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, and New York have all started their own inquiries into the dioceses in their states, with varying degrees of severity.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Cathedral in War-Torn Aleppo Re-Opens

by Tess Daniels

 

“Our people have overcome,” Patriarch Ignace Joseph III Younan declared to the faithful gathered in Aleppo. Celebrating the first Mass in the newly restored Our Lady of the Assumption Syriac Catholic Church on September 9th, Younan proclaimed, “We will always be people of hope and life.” This inaugural Mass was filled to the brim with worshippers, representatives of Aleppo civil authorities, and renowned clergy including, Cardinal Mario Zenari—the Vatican nuncio to Syria—and bishops of other Christian churches.

 

 

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Dr. Kreeft Encourages Faithful Amidst Scandal

by Amanda Judah

 

On September 20, Dr. Peter Kreeft addressed an expectant audience in Devlin 008, discussing “Why I Stay Catholic In Times of Scandal”. Given the recent reports of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church, Dr. Kreeft encouraged the BC population to recommit itself to the body of Christ. As a Boston College theology and philosophy professor since 1965, Dr. Kreeft drew upon his extensive textual knowledge during his presentation.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Annual Mass of the Holy Spirit Reminds Boston College of Our Mission

Mass of the Holy Spirit 2018
Fr. Jack Butler, S.J., delivers the Homily at the Mass of the Holy Spirit

by Olivia Colombo

 

On Thursday, September 6, the Boston College community came together in faith to celebrate the annual Mass of the Holy Spirit, a Jesuit tradition that commences the academic year.  University President Rev. William Leahy, S.J. presided, and Vice President for University Mission and Ministry Rev. Jack Butler, S.J. was the homilist. Due to an excessive heat warning, the Mass was moved inside to Conte Forum, where students, faculty, and other community members gathered to celebrate the liturgy.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Fr James Martin Lectures on a Ministry of Revival and Love

by Justin Schnebelen

 

On Thursday September 21, hundreds jammed the at-capacity Robsham Theatre for the first annual Daniel Harrington, SJ Lecture. As a Church speaking heavyweight, Editor at Large of America Magazine, and recent author of Building a Bridge. Fr. James Martin took the stage for a much-anticipated reflection, based on the insights he gained as Harrington’s former pupil, especially Harrington’s years of ministry to all limbs of the Body of Christ.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Boston College Screens Pope Francis: A Man of His Word

by Patrick Stallwood

 

On September 12,  the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life hosted a screening of Pope Francis: A Man of His Word featuring a faculty panel of Sr. Mary Ann Hinsdale, IHM, associate professor Theresa O’Keefe, and Fr. Peter Folan, S.J. Sr. Mary Ann Hinsdale is associate professor of theology and sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. She specializes in feminist theology and ecclesiology. Theresa O’Keefe is the associate professor of the practice of youth and young adult faith. Her specialties also include educational and ministerial formation, as well as feminist theology. Fr. Peter Folan is a Jesuit doctoral candidate in systematic theology. His research pertains to the use of scripture for theological reflection, as well as the importance of ecumenical dialogue.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

The Council of Ephesus: Who Really is Christ?

by Mina Ghaly

 

The setting is fifth century AD, and the assailant is Nestorius, Archbishop of Constantinople. The true nature of Jesus Christ is under attack by heresy, and the Virgin Mary is no stranger to Nestorius’ ill-intentioned ways. Ironically enough, we would tend to believe that a bishop would shepherd his people, leading them to eternal salvation—not so with Nestorius. Nestorius had argued that Christ should be viewed as being two separate persons—human and divine—united by will.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

The Finer Points of Papal Infallibility

by Mathieu Ronayne

 

Few elements of Catholicism are as broadly misunderstood by Catholics and non-Catholics alike as the doctrine of papal infallibility. This teaching refers to the inability of the Church to formally teach error—a gift owing to divine guidance. Within specific contexts, infallibility encompasses the college of bishops. The Second Vatican Council states in Lumen Gentium that “although the individual bishops do not enjoy the prerogative of infallibility, they can nevertheless proclaim Christ’s doctrine infallibly.” Furthermore, the bishops’ authority is even clearer when they are all “gathered together in an ecumenical council.” Uniquely, however, as the head of the college of bishops and the Vicar of Christ, the pope maintains individual infallibility, as granted by Christ.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Thomas Asks: What is Grace, Anyway?

by Gerard DeAngelis

 

What exactly is grace? We often claim to be in someone’s “good graces,” or we might sit behind Grace in Calculus. Luckily, in the “Prima Secundae,” or “First Part of the Second Part,” of his Summa Theologiae, St. Thomas Aquinas gives an answer. In Question 110, getting ready to present his treatise on the theological virtues, St. Thomas turns his attention to what grace is—what he calls its “essence.”

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Saint of the Issue: Augustine of Hippo

by David O'Neill

 

On August 28th, the Church celebrated the Feast of St. Augustine of Hippo. As the patron saint of sore eyes, his invocation usually becomes necessary around this time of the semester as the amount of reading increases.

 

Augustine was born in 354 in a small Roman city called Tagaste, in present-day Algeria. His mother Monica was a Christian, and his father was a pagan.

 

 

At the time, infant baptism was not a common practice of the Church. As a boy, Augustine became perilously ill and his mother wanted to baptize him, thinking he was about to die. However, he recovered, and his family decided against baptizing him out of fear that the sins he committed after baptism would make him more guilty than those committed before baptism.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Concert Celebrates the Faith and Joy of 11-Year-Old Christina Dangond

by Olivia Colombo

 

“4 bands, 1 stage, rock the night! 1 message: proclaim the light!”

 

On Saturday evening, September 22, a multicultural community of Boston Catholics gathered in worship for the “Build the Faith Music Fest,” a concert in memory of Christina Dangond and benefiting her foundation, which builds churches in impoverished areas.  At St. Mary of the Annunciation Parish in Cambridge, local Catholic musicians, including Ministério de Música Paraclíto, Higher Love, Katoli-k, and Jon Niven, led the congregation in multilingual worship.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Spiritually Dead? Better Call Saul!

by Jack Long

 

Compared to its predecessor, Better Call Saul is a quaint show. There have yet to be any of the explosive wheelchairs, airline catastrophes, or machine gun turrets that stole the spotlight on Breaking Bad while its fatherly hero descends into a mad druglord; instead, Saul draws in excited audiences with advertising disputes, fake allergies, and elder law, all tied together by a protagonist whose unique arc sees him transform from a guilty fraud to a guiltier fraud. Besides overlap in the supporting cast, there is really only one desire that Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul both satisfy: the need for final justice.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Euthanasia is the Most Serious Threat to Human Dignity Today

by Marcus Otte

 

The unique horrors of abortion are primarily its volume (recently estimated at 3,000 per day in the US), the complete innocence of its victims, and its sundering of the maternal relation. Even so, euthanasia has an even greater power to disfigure consciences and to destroy our understanding of the significance of life. In these respects, it is perhaps the most dire threat to human dignity today.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Hope for the Hopeless

by Christian Rodriguez

 

I met my friend Darryl during my post-grad service experience working at the St. Margaret’s Center in South L.A. On one hot day in sunny Southern California everyone had taken a seat on the ground under the shade of the balcony, except for Darryl. It had to have been close to 90 degrees and yet he chose to sit under the pergola, dressed in jeans and a black hoodie. The sun which shone brightly through the wood beams highlighted the sweat glistening on his brow and the metal of the shopping cart he had with him. The cart held all of his possessions—clothes, some instant ramen noodles, and a small yappy chihuahua. After some time, the dog stopped yapping and Darryl was forced to take off his hoodie, revealing a shirt which looked like it had been doused by a fire hydrant.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Homesickness as an Echo of God

by Adriana Watkins

 

There are some problems so ordinary it feels wrong to suffer because of them. Around October, when 95% of the student body catches the same common cold, your peers might be understanding of you, but they won’t be too sympathetic. There will come a time, as you drown in Kleenex, that you realize it’s silly to complain. All you’ll likely hear in response is, “Me too, and I’ve got pinkeye.” Someone will always have it worse, and you might feel bad for struggling so much with a burden everyone seems to have.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

A Personal Reflection on the Abuse Scandal

by Ejuma Adoga

  
 
The recent revelations of abuse in the Catholic church have dominated the news for the past few weeks. Naturally, as a devout Catholic, I read up on all of the reports and accounts of the survivors. Buzzfeed News did a powerful and heartbreaking report on abuses committed by Catholic Nuns at St. Joseph’s Orphanage in Vermont, which troubled me. After all of my research into the unspeakable injustice in the Catholic Church, I was left feeling shocked, disgusted, and shameful. I cannot imagine the pain these survivors have felt for years, not being able to speak out because of the power and positions of their perpetrators, and forced to remain silent because of fear, shame, or the belief that no one would take them seriously.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

To the Class of 2022

by Bianca Passero

 

This article is adapted from Bianca’s blog, “Made for More, Made for Love.”

 

Dear Incoming College Freshmen,

            

I remember being in your shoes three years ago, and it though feels like ages ago, I remember it like it was yesterday. ...Freshman year had a lot of ups and downs, but nonetheless I grew in many areas of my life and learned a lot. I thought I could pass on some knowledge I gained my freshman year of college to make this milestone in your life a little bit less scary.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

"Therefore the World Glorifies You"

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

In the Eastern tradition, all the rites of the Church are sung. Since the melodies are generally easy to pick up, a person who attends these services regularly will undoubtedly get certain hymns stuck in their head, especially the ones that are sung every day. Chances are that if you have ever attended an Eastern Vespers service, you remember “O Gladsome Light,” which is sung at the procession. As a child serving during Vespers, I remember taking great care to make sure I did not trip over my words when I was in front of everyone. This hymn has been a constant reminder of God’s Providence in my life, being at its core an exaltation of the Trinity upon seeing the sunset.

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Wed

26

Sep

2018

Partying Gregorian-Style

by Adriana Watkins

 

If you’ve been on campus at least one weekend, you’ve heard the beat of bass-lines on a Friday night. Of course, there’s plenty of shouting and laughing and singing along, too. But have you ever wondered, as you weaved through dorm buildings, what all the noise is for? All the upbeat, celebratory songs—what’s the occasion?

 

“Well,” you say. “I’m not sure about that, but I do know when I’m talking to a killjoy.”

            

Granted—but on thinking further, you’d probably answer, “We’re celebrating Friday night.”

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