Wed

21

Nov

2018

Pride, Prejudice, and Discernment

by Justin Schnebelen

 

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a great fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

 

Boston College Theatre Department’s performance of Pride and Prejudice, based off of Jane Austen’s original novel, and directed by John Houchin explored the truths encapsulated within the book’s aforementioned opening line, a line which also provides valuable insights into the endeavor of discernment. The play ran from November 15th through November 18th.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

US Bishops Meet to Address Abuse Crisis; Vatican Delays Vote on New Guidelines

Bishops of the US gather for their annual fall meeting on Nov. 12, 2018, in Baltimore. (RNS/AP/Patrick Semansky)
Bishops of the US gather for their annual fall meeting on Nov. 12, 2018, in Baltimore. (RNS/AP/Patrick Semansky)

by Mathieu Ronayne

 

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) gathered for their annual General Assembly on November 12-14 in Baltimore, Maryland. In an October 30 press release, they announced their expectations for the Assembly discussion, and anticipated a vote on “a series of concrete measures to respond to the abuse crisis.” They said they would also vote on the Pastoral Letter Against Racism (a report after the recent Synod on Youth) as well as the cause for canonization for Sr. Thea Bowman, FSPA.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Saint of the Issue: Martin of Tours

by Lourdes Macaspac

 

Saint Martin of Tours, patron saint of the poor, soldiers, tailors, winemakers, and conscientious objectors, ora pro nobis!

 

Martin was born around AD 316 to pagan parents, yet the boy chose another path; drawn to Christianity, Martin decided to become a Christian at age 10. Shortly before his birth, Christianity had been legalized in the Roman Empire under Constantine.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

How Long Must I Struggle?

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

A friend mentioned to me recently that despite the fact that he fully accepts the Lord in his mind, his will still struggles. In his words, he finds it difficult to surrender fully to God. I might suspect that this was a unique problem that affects only him and myself, if it were not for the fact that this issue is so often discussed in Scripture. The Lord Himself says, “Keep watching and praying that you may not enter into temptation; the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak” (Mt. 26:41). He gives this directive to the Apostles. St. Paul is even more stark: “I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched mind that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death?” (Rom. 7:22-24).

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Nothing But the Best

by Adriana Watkins

 

This summer, my family invited me to join them on a 17-mile bike ride through the mountains, and because I love them, I accepted. But also because they “invited” me sternly not to refuse. It’d been a long time since I’d gone bike riding, and I wasn’t looking forward to it. I’m not too coordinated—last year I walked straight into the living-room wall. My prospects for success on a bicycle seemed grim.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Patience for the Road Ahead

by Amanda Judah

 

Recently I was interviewing a subject for an oral history interview—not necessarily a location where one would expect to find God. While the man in front of me did mention his involvement in his local parish, I connected with his spirituality most through his discussion of patience. He spoke of encouraging others to find more patience in their lives, trusting that their goals would come to fruition. When others were going through challenges, he reminded them to have patience and hope for the future. Even if their present circumstances couldn’t be changed, he argued, people wouldn’t give up if they knew something better was coming down the line. This unwavering hope in the future is what can make patience so powerful. We will certainly be blessed in the future, and being patient for those blessings allows us to be more content with our present circumstances.

 

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

On Music in Mass

by Gerardo Martinez Cordeiro

 

He who sings to God, prays twice. When I was younger, I would hear this expression constantly, growing up in a Catholic school in Mexico. The brothers of the Order of St. John Baptist de la Salle, who ran my school, would remind us of this adage whenever we would prepare for Mass, or really any time we would learn about song, prayer, and worship. As I got older, I began to appreciate more and gained a deeper understanding of the wisdom behind those words.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Spiritual Self-Care for the Holiday Season

by Ejuma Adoga

 

In the past couple of weeks or even months of the year, to say that the news has been heartbreaking is an understatement. From the shooting in Squirrel Hill to the one in Thousand Oaks to the wildfires in Northern California and everything in between, it has been exhausting. Even personally, in our own lives with work and midterms and tests, it can be hard to get into the holiday spirit. We may feel like we have the weight of the world on our shoulders and that the future looks bleak. When I am feeling overwhelmed by the weight of the world, I find that spiritual self-care really pulls me through and here are some things that help me.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

A Grave, Public, and Manifest Scandal

by Christian Rodriguez

 

“Things are a lot better now! No one has been abused in 20 years!” Hearing these words come out of the mouth of a priest right before the final blessing, you can only imagine my utter shock and sheer rage.

 

I was visiting the Catholic community of another university in the area when I heard this. Citing recent listening sessions about the Church’s sex abuse scandal and cover up, that community’s campus minister announced that she had printed out a recent article to share. The priest appeared upset about this and began a rant about how the news is not to be believed, that Cardinal Sean O’Malley had given him assurances that abuse has not happened, and that a priest friend of his has been accused then cleared of the allegation.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Migrant Caravan Waits in Tijuana After Difficult Journey

Border fence between Tijuana (right) and San Diego's border patrol offices (left).
Border fence between Tijuana (right) and San Diego's border patrol offices (left).

by Adriana Watkins

 

A group of approximately 2,000-3,000 migrants from Central America reached Tijuana, Mexico on November 15, with more set to arrive as the weeks continue. The travelers, mostly seeking escape from poverty and violence, are citizens of Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.  They made the trek in a long line or caravan, alternatively walking and hitchhiking. During rest periods, they camped in large groups.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Remembering Christopher Dawson

Fr. Arthur Madigan, S.J.
Fr. Arthur Madigan, S.J.

by Fr. Arthur Madigan, S.J.

 

Fr. Arthur Madigan, S.J. is a Professor of Philosophy. He specializes in Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. Over the years, Fr. Madigan has translated works from Aristotle and has contributed to numerous journals and essay collections. He previously served as Chair of the Philosophy Department at Boston College.

 

The English historian of culture Christopher Dawson (1889-1970) is all but forgotten, even among historians, even among Catholics.

 

Dawson belonged to a cohort of twentieth-century historians who converted to Catholicism. (For more on this remarkable group, see Chapter XI of Patrick Allitt’s, Catholic Converts:  British and American Intellectuals Turn to Rome.) In an era when history meant mainly political history, Dawson pioneered the historical study of culture. In a period when materialist interpretations of history were in vogue, he insisted that the history of cultures can only be understood through the religions that animated those cultures. At a time when the influence of Christianity appeared to be on the wane, or perhaps was on the wane, he published The Historic Reality of Christian Culture.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Cornerstone: Origins of Monasticism: What About Us?

St. Anthony the Great
St. Anthony the Great

by Mina Ghaly

 

We all know who monks are—ascetics who have left the material world to delve into lives of seclusion, prayer, and fasting in the name of Jesus Christ. The Desert Fathers instituted this life of eternal devotion to Christ, which is still practiced by many sects throughout the world 16 centuries later.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

A Closer Look at the Stained Glass of Bapst Library

 by Ethan Starr

  

Guided tours across Boston College’s campus have several consistent destinations; Stokes, Gasson, and Fulton are all featured proudly as enduring symbols of the continual development of BC’s campus and the Collegiate Gothic style they claim to emulate. No buildings of overtly religious function are highlighted to prospective students, but one cannot help but be reminded of the school’s Catholic foundations when circling through Bapst Library.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Thomas Asks: How Do We Merit to Be Co-Heirs to Eternal Life?

by Gerard DeAngelis

 

It seems the greatest joy of Christianity is that Someone always loves us no matter how sinful we are, and will give us without fail a “good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over” (Lk. 6:38) not because of our “own doing,” but “by grace” (Eph. 2:8). Yet, on the other hand, we know that if we claim to have a relationship with this Great Lover and receive the superabundance of His life, we must “keep the commandments (Mt. 19:17) and work towards Him “with fear and trembling” (Phil. 2:12). 

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Reclaiming Ember Days

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

“Fasting days and Emberings be

Lent, Whitsun, Holyrood, and Lucie”

 

So the old rhyme goes, listing the times of year when the Ember days fall. These are days of fasting and abstinence which come four times a year at the change of the seasons. The Ember Days occupy the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of the week on which they fall. As indicated by the rhyme, they come the week after Ash Wednesday, Pentecost, Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross (Sept. 14), and Feast of St. Lucy (Dec. 13).

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Lecture Addresses Genesis of Human Rights

by Justin Schnebelen

 

The employment of the idea of human rights has been woven into our country’s vernacular and legal code since Jefferson penned those now illustrious words which established our country’s independence. What is much less established, however, is the distinct point at which those rights begin.

 

 

On November 13, Dr. Sarah Byers, a member of Boston College’s Philosophy Department, outfitted the crowd gathered in Higgins Hall with both scientific and philosophical tools for answering that very question.

 

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Gasson Lecture Details A Tale of Two Cardinals In Victorian Britain

by Jonathan Gaworski

 

The president emeritus of Fairfield University, Fr. Jeffrey von Arx S.J., delivered Boston College’s fall Gasson lecture on November 14th. He is additionally slated to deliver the spring Gasson lecture in 2019. His lecture focused on the intertwining lives of two 19th century British cardinals, Bl. John Henry Newman and Henry Edward Manning. Newman, the elegant theologian and essayist, continues to be celebrated as much by English departments for his wordsmithy as by theology departments for his doctrine. Manning, the grim and hard-nosed hierarch, is less remembered, though no less influential during his lifetime.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

Asia Bibi's Release Roils Pakistan

by Tess Daniels

 

Pakistan’s Supreme Court has acquitted and freed Asia Bibi, a Pakistani Roman Catholic woman who has spent eight years on death row for blasphemy. The news of her release has sparked violent protests and death threats against authorities from Pakistani Muslims. The media widely reported that Ms. Bibi had been flown out of the country, inciting more outrage; however, Pakistani officials denied any such action.

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Wed

21

Nov

2018

World Commemorates 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day

Poppies surround the Tower of London in remembrance of Armistice Day
Poppies surround the Tower of London in remembrance of Armistice Day

by Olivia Colombo

 

On Sunday, November 11, the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I was commemorated with services and acts of remembrance around the world. The community of Boston College also gathered together for a Mass and prayer service to honor veteran alumni.

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Tue

13

Nov

2018

Professors Discuss Fr. Mark Massa's New Book on Humanae Vitae

by Amanda Judah

 

On November 5th, The Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life hosted their last panel event of the semester in Stokes Hall. The panelists were responding to Father Mark Massa,S.J.,’s new book, The Structure of Theological Revolutions: How the Fight Over Birth Control Transformed American Catholicism. Fr. Massa is well-known among theological circles at Boston College, serving as the director of the Boisi Center and is a former Dean of the School of Theology and Ministry. Fr. Massa stated that his work was “not a history of birth control”, but focused on how “Catholics played a major role on both sides of this debate”. Instead, Fr. Massa focused on “a history of different models of natural law that come out of the debate surrounding Humanae Vitae and the birth control crisis”. In addition to Fr. Massa, the panelists were Professor Lisa Sowle Cahill, Father James Keenan, S.J., Professor Meghan Clark from St. John’s University, and moderator Richard Gaillardetz.

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Mon

12

Nov

2018

Chris Darcy Discusses Getting Back in the Game at Agape Latte

by Patrick Stallwood

 

Agape Latte hosted its second talk of the year on November 6th with a story by Chris Darcy. Chris Darcy is an associate director in Campus Ministry, an active volunteer with St. Ignatius Parish, and has also worked with many Boston College retreats, such as Arrupe and Kairos. In addition, Darcy volunteers as a baseball coach in his hometown of Natick Massachusetts. Although Darcy’s talk was entitled “Getting Back in the Game”, it centered around a different activity than sports: his faith life. Darcy admitted that faith is now “one of my greatest passions,” even if it wasn’t always that way.

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