Thu

03

May

2018

Considering the Pope's Proposal on the Lord's Prayer

by Ethan Starr

 

“And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.” Catholics, along with most other Christian denominations, still utter these words, the very phrases Jesus instructed his Apostles to emulate, in what Christians have since referred to as the Lord’s Prayer. This past December, Pope Francis expressed support for an adjustment to the translation of the Lord’s Prayer, specifically advocating for the insertion of “Do not let us fall into temptation.” The Pope went on to reason that God does not lead people into temptation, stating “A father doesn’t do that.” 

 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Seasons, Friendship, and Eternal Life

by Jacqueline Arnold

 

Life here on earth, by its definition, is full of seasons, which implies beginnings and endings. Some are tangible, others are not. Graduating university and leaving behind a very unique time in my life—one saturated with intense learning, growing, and community—is a very tangible ending, to say the least. 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Letting Go

by Jamie Myrose

 

I have often thought that Mary Magdalene’s encounter with the Risen Christ in John 20:11-18 was a rather strange story, most especially in its Easter context. After losing one of her closest friends, Mary has been given a supernatural gift: to see her dead friend once again. Upon recognizing her friend, Mary longs to embrace him, but Christ oddly replies, “noli me tangere;” “Do not cling to me.” For the longest time, I could not understand why Christ would not choose to embrace his friend. Eventually, I came to realize that I was missing the message of the pericope: this is not a story about friends reuniting but instead about the willingness to part from them.

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Thu

03

May

2018

Pentecost: A Time of Goodbyes

by Christian Rodriguez

 

It’s that time of year again. Classes are winding down, procrastination is finally catching up to us, and we begin saying our goodbyes. For some of us, we say goodbye to friends that we expect to see again next year. Whether they are going back home, vacationing, or taking an internship out of state, there is at least some certainty that we will get to see each other again on move-in weekend in the fall. Even if they are studying abroad in the fall, we still can expect to see each other again in January. There exists a founded hope that we will see each other again.

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Thu

03

May

2018

The English Language isn't that Bad for Discussing Love

by Marcus Otte

 

In Catholic circles, you often hear that English is deficient because we only have one word for “love,” whereas the ancient Greeks had four, or five, or six (the number changes depending on who you talk to). Supposedly, this wider vocabulary meant the Greeks had words for specifying different kinds of love, e.g., brotherly love vs. romantic love, whereas English-speakers are stuck with one all-encompassing (and therefore, ambiguous) word: love.

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Thu

03

May

2018

"Rage, Rage Against the Dying of the Light"

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

In 1947, Dylan Thomas wrote “Do not go gentle into that good night,” as a plea to his father to continue fighting against his impending death. It is unclear what inspired Thomas’ verse in this case, since the poem was written a few years before his own father’s health problems started.

 

On the same theme, one might recall Jimmy Valvano’s stirring speech at the 1993 ESPN awards, where he said: “Don’t give up, don’t ever give up.” For Valvano at least, his cancer diagnosis was not the end of the fight but only the beginning. He continues, “That’s what I’m going to try to do every minute that I have left. I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. If you see me, smile and give me a hug. That’s important to me too.”

 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Faith In Action: A Different Calling

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

God has a specific calling for each of us. Whether it is priesthood, marriage, the single life, or anything in between, God, at the moment when we were created, had a plan in mind for us. For most people, this call is marriage. For me, God’s call has led me to seek out a new path.

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Thu

03

May

2018

Religion and Skepticism on Campus: An Interview with Bishop Barron

by Adriana Watkins

 

On April 24, Bishop Robert Barron, theologian and founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries, spoke with The Torch staff on the subject of religion and skepticism. The Bishop began by describing skepticism as a perspective that often “traps” its adherents “in Plato’s Cave,” unable to broaden their views. He then went on to describe possible benefits of the outlook, especially in the context of the university, and to offer advice to students as they continue their search for the truth.

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Thu

03

May

2018

A Quiet Place: Family Over Fear

by Patrick Stallwood

 

WARNING: This article contains minor spoilers from A Quiet Place

 

A Quiet Place has been dominating the box office this month and for a good reason. The movie has garnered praise from critics and amateurs alike, who were pleasantly surprised by John Krasinski’s ability to direct, write, and star in an action-horror movie after rising to fame as Jim in The Office. John Krasinski and his wife Emily Blunt play the parents of actors Noah Jupe and Millicent Simmonds; collectively, they are known as the Abbot family. Simmonds performance is especially remarkable, as she is deaf and is playing a deaf child, bringing authenticity to the role. 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Break it Down Boston 2018 Showcases Christian Acapella

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

On April 7, Christian acapella groups from colleges throughout the North-East gathered in Trinity Chapel for this year’s Break It Down Boston concert. 

 

Every year one college in Boston hosts this event, and this year it was Boston College’s turn. Against the Current, BC’s Christian acapella group, welcomed seventeen other groups from as far away as Johns Hopkins University and as close to home as Boston University.

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Thu

03

May

2018

What it Takes to Run the Marathon

Marathon runner Evelyn Rakowsky (MCAS '18) takes a quick photo break with her friends (Photo credit: Stephanie Nekoroski)
Marathon runner Evelyn Rakowsky (MCAS '18) takes a quick photo break with her friends (Photo credit: Stephanie Nekoroski)

by Patrick Stallwood

 

The Boston Marathon is among the most iconic races in the United States. It is the oldest and the fastest in the country, dating back to 1897 with a median finish time of 3 hours and 44 minutes. This year, the marathon runners were buffeted by cold rain and wind, yet persevered. 

 

One participant running for charity was Evelyn Rakowsky, MCAS ’18. Rakowsky has always loved running, and was part of the cross-country team in high school. She added running a marathon to her bucket list, and in the fall of her junior year, she ran the Philadelphia Marathon. 

 

This year was Rakowsky’s first Boston Marathon. She joyfully recounts, “When I saw the marathon for the first time, I just stood at Mile 21 with my friends for the whole day with signs, and it was such a special experience.” She knew then that she had to run it.

 

 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Historian Speaks on Abuse, Memory, and Religion

by Jeffery Lindholm

 

The girl with the pseudonym “Mary Ross” called her experience “my little Hell.” God had abandoned her. Her desire for God endured, and what she desired was His presence. She prayed, “If you [God] really want me, you have to do something to or for me.” The next thing she remembers was waking up with scrapes all over her body. This was her sign—violence as her indication of God’s presence.

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Thu

03

May

2018

Fr. Ken Himes: The Power of Mentors

by Amanda Judah

 

In the second-to-last Agape Latte of the year, Fr. Kenneth Himes regaled Hillside Café with stories about the power of mentorship. Himes has taught at Boston College since 1996, and serves as a full-time professor of Theological Ethics. In his April 10 talk, the professor recounted several stories about his coming of age, with an emphasis on the important role his mentors played in the process. 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Hookup Culture an "Aspirin for Loneliness"

by Adriana Watkins

 

On April 12, a large group of Boston College students filled a Merkert lecture hall. They were there to hear Fr. Paul McNellis, S.J., speak about the landscape of modern college sexuality, in a talk entitled, “The Hookup Culture: Here to Stay?”The lecture came at what McNellis considers an important moment, as the normalization of transient sexuality has made hookups “just one [more] lifestyle choice.”

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Thu

03

May

2018

Pope Francis Calls Us to ‘Rejoice and Be Glad’ in New Exhortation

by Tess Daniels

 

Gaudete et exsultate, or “Rejoice and be glad,” was released on April 9 by Pope Francis, his third apostolic exhortation. The 44-page exhortation delves into the definition and consequences of holiness and gives practical advice for living out the call to holiness in ordinary life. Pope Francis writes that Jesus does not want us to settle for “a bland and mediocre existence,” and notes that the call to holiness is present from the very first pages of the Bible. Francis declares that “very often it is a holiness found in our next-door neighbours, those who, living in our midst, reflect God’s presence. We might call them ‘the middle class of holiness.’” 

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Thu

03

May

2018

Christian Patriarchs Condemn U.S. Strike on Syria

Image by Staff Sergeant Chelsea Browning via Wikimedia Commons
Image by Staff Sergeant Chelsea Browning via Wikimedia Commons

by Jack Long

 

The missile strikes directed by the United States and its allies against the Syrian government have been condemned as a brutal aggression in a letter from three Christian Patriarchs from the region.

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Thu

03

May

2018

Mass Attendance at Record Lows for US Catholics

by David O'Neill

 

According to a recent study by Gallup, which has tracked Mass participation in American Catholics since 1955, attendance at Sunday Mass has fallen to an all-time low across age groups. The poll consisted of a simple question: Has the interviewee attended a church service in the past seven days?  

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Thu

03

May

2018

Alfie Evans Case Renews Humane Healthcare Debate

Image: Katie James / Facebook
Image: Katie James / Facebook

by Adriana Watkins

 

Alfie Evans, a child removed from life support by a British hospital, died on April 28 after a lengthy legal debate surrounding his care. His case gained international attention in the week before his death, as his parents petitioned the court to overturn the decision that would remove him from his ventilator. Evans’ situation has been compared to that of Charlie Gard, who died in 2017 after a similar court-ordered removal from life support. 

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Thu

03

May

2018

In Gratitude for Healthy Debate

by Annalise Deal

 

Freshman year, I attended the student activities fair with two intentions in mind: to join a student newspaper, and to find groups where I could develop my faith. As God would have it, an enthusiastic student approached me near the campus ministry tables with the offer of writing for the Catholic newspaper. I immediately let him know I was Episcopalian, but he insisted The Torch existed to address issues of faith more broadly—so I joined.

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