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2018

A Holy Week of Hope

by Jamie Myrose

 

I get weird looks sometimes when I say that Palm Sunday is my favorite day of the year. While I do think that part of it is that I am not typically at Boston College to celebrate Easter with my friends and this is our substitute, I think another, more significant part of my affection for the day is the message behind the day. Palm Sunday is a day of forgiveness.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

The Dance of Friendship

by Hadley Hustead

 

The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit have lots of hobbies. God for sure loves baby knitting (Psalm 139:13), restoring hearts (147:3), forgiving His reckless children (1 John 1:9), and for sure landscaping (Psalm 95:5). However, I’m starting to believe that God is especially fond of orchestrating companionship between His children--despite our recklessness. In fact, I am pretty sure all three Persons of the Trinity get especially psyched about friendship. The sacred dance of human relationship is the most intimate and tangible portal we have to our Father’s incomprehensible love. Unfortunately, our brokenness creates a lot of room for error in relationships and we are always getting it wrong.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Why is Evil Evil?

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

The problem of evil is well-known to most Christians today. In fact, you have likely heard some version of this problem from your non-believing friends. It proceeds from the premise that some evil has happened which an all-good God would not allow. Since this evil did occur, however, there are three choices open: either God is not all-good and did not wish to stop it, or He is not all-powerful and could not stop it, or He does not exist in the first place. Since the first two options seem illogical—if there were an eternal, perfect God, He would be all-good and all-powerful—the problem of evil seems to show that God does not exist.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Courage Looks Like Recklessness, but We Should be Courageous Anyway

by Marcus Otte

 

A few months ago, I was visiting a friend at St. Mary’s College, in California. I taught the day’s lesson to his class, and afterwards we returned to his home. Upon leaving the college, we had to drive down a winding mountain road. We had not gone far, when we encountered two men, both college-age, skateboarding down the mountain. One of them was filming a video of their skating run.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Holy Saturday: The Harrowing of Hell

by David O'Neill

 

Growing up, there was a line of the Apostles' Creed that always puzzled me, and it became even more puzzling to me after the retranslation of the Mass in 2011. As a child I remember praying “…died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day…” In my limited knowledge of the faith, I thought I understood what “descended to the dead” meant; it must have just been a restating of the earlier “died and was buried”, Christ was dead from the point of His crucifixion to His resurrection. However, I didn’t know what Christ did for this period of His death, and as a child this question never surfaced itself. However, in Advent of 2011, we implemented a new translation of the liturgical texts that better reflect the Latin. This includes the Apostles Creed. No longer did we profess that “He descended to the dead”; the new translation reads “…died, and was buried. he descended into hell; on the third day…”.

 

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Pange Lingua Gloriosi

by Natasha Zinos

 

On Holy Thursday, as the altar is stripped and the Blessed Sacrament is moved out of the main church, “Pange lingua gloriosi, Corporis mysterium” echoes in the church. This hymn was composed by St. Thomas Aquinas, but it shares its first line and its triumphal tone with the earlier Hymn of Fortunatus. Aquinas’ hymn however, composed for the Solemnity of Corpus Christi, is sung during the Liturgy of Holy Thursday, where we celebrate the institution of the Blessed Sacrament at the Last Supper.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Patrick Downes: A True Man for Others

by Amanda Judah

 

On March 19, Patrick Downes addressed a packed Yawkey Function Room for the Ignatian Society’s inaugural “Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam” lecture (AMDG). The lecture series aims to attract a speaker who embodies the values of this Ignatian mission, whose Latin translates to, “For the greater glory of God.” Downes’ efforts over the past five years have made him more than eligible to speak in the series. As a double Eagle, he  is well versed in the oft-quoted “men and women for others” motto of the University. His speech illustrated how this title can become “the most powerful” in a person’s life, if they are willing to accept the fact that humans are responsible for one other.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Cardinal DiNardo Calls for All to Abide in Christ

by Jeffery Lindholm

 

On March 15, Daniel Cardinal DiNardo, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Archbishop of Galveston-Houston, spoke to the Boston College community about friendship in the Gospel of John. Cardinal DiNardo claimed that there is “something about John’s Gospel that is special.” Drawing on Scripture and the early Church Fathers, the Cardinal presented a long meditation on the Church, rooted in one word: caritas

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Model UN Gives Historical, Religious Perspectives

by Adriana Watkins

 

On the weekend of March 16-18, approximately 650 high school students flooded hotel rooms at the Westin Copley. The students, who came from around the country and the world, arrived in Boston with suits and ties, extensive notes, and starry eyes. Phones were put away one by one as the crowds filed into their conference rooms. The doors shut, the noise died, and the fun began: the teenagers were no longer students, but delegates. Their goal? To save the world.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Sister Jean: The 98-Year-Old Nun Turned Face of March Madness

 by Armen Grigorian

 

Every March millions of people, diehard college basketball fans and casual onlookers alike, tune in to watch the NCAA Division 1 College Basketball Tournament, dubbed by many, as “March Madness.” Audiences not only love watching the games, but also making their own brackets trying to predict which underdog will make a deep run in the tournament. This year that underdog is Loyola Chicago, as they became just the fourth eleventh seeded team in history to make it to the Final Four. Perhaps though, for the first time, the team itself that is making the run isn’t the biggest story. Instead, the biggest story of the tournament so far is Loyola Chicago’s team chaplain, the 98-year-old Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

A Kingdom Not of This World: Kingship in Black Panther

by Patrick Stallwood

 

Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t seen the movie yet… seriously?

 

To say Black Panther is a success is an understatement. As of writing this article, the movie has grossed 1.2 billion dollars worldwide, and is on track to be the 11th highest grossing movie of all time. It has become the highest grossing superhero movie ever in the United States. Furthermore, the soundtrack for the movie, curated by Kendrick Lamar, rocketed to the top of the charts upon its release. Numbers aside, this movie is a cultural milestone, as a black superhero finally gains the attention he deserves when comic book movies have struggled with diversity in leading roles.  

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Quizes, Horoscopes, and Self-Identity

by Adriana Watkins

 

There is no way to write this article without sounding like a killjoy. If the reader will forgive me, I think it’s worthwhile to talk about self-identification and social media. Specifically, BuzzFeed quizzes, “tag yourself” memes, astrological signs, and all the other things pop culture offers to help us fill in the blanks about our identities. We consume these things for fun, but to what extent do they illustrate a real search for self-knowledge?

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Ireland's Exile

by Jack Long

 

Saint Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland and his feast is a yearly excuse to drink to excess. These excessive celebrations of St. Patrick’s Day at least coincide with the commemoration of the life of a heroically good man. Thanks to the missionary work of St. Patrick, Ireland has become Catholic to its core. Yet few are aware that they owe their belief to a foreigner oppressed by the Irish.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Tridentine Latin Mass Returns to Campus

by Ethan Starr

 

After several years of absence from the on-campus Mass schedule, the Tridentine Latin Mass returned to Boston College at the beginning of Lent. Students can now attend Masses celebrated in ecclesiastical Latin on Fridays at noon in St. Joseph’s Chapel.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

We are an Easter People

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

We all know the story. A man named Jesus of Nazareth, after His earthly pilgrimage was to come to an end, he was condemned to death by Pontius Pilate, suffered immensely, and crucified on Calvary on Good Friday. But we also know that is not the end of the story. He rose on the third day: Easter Sunday. The climax of our Christian faith lies in the living reality of Easter Sunday: the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is this reality that makes us a Christian people.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Ireland to Vote on Legalization of Abortion

by Bianca Passero

 

In 1983, the Irish electorate voted in favor of the 8th Amendment which reads, “The State acknowledges the right to life of the unborn and, with due regard to the equal right to life of the mother, guarantees in its laws to respect, and, as is practicable, by its laws to defend and vindicate that right.” This amendment protects the life of the unborn as well as the life of the mother. However, this Amendment may soon be repealed. 

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Pope Francis Celebrates 5 Years as Pope

by Tess Daniels

 

On March 1, Pope Francis celebrated the five-year anniversary of his election to the papacy. With this milestone comes an examination of Francis’s accomplishments and controversies. Francis, though a hugely influential and compelling figure, has nonetheless had his fair share of criticism. He is seen by the world as a reformer pope—a humble, highly educated, genial Jesuit who seems to depart from the practices of previous pontiffs. On the other hand, traditionalist Catholics have objected to Francis’ agenda, arguing that a pope should deliver doctrinal and moral clarity, and Francis’s policy has blurred Catholic teachings.

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Tensions Rise in Jerusalem

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

On March 7, Israel passed a law giving the Minister of the Interior the power to revoke the permanent residency status of Palestinians living in East Jerusalem if they commit a “breach of trust.”

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Wed

28

Mar

2018

Remembering Stephen Hawking

by Patrick Stallwood

 

Stephen Hawking, the groundbreaking theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and cultural icon, has died at the age of 76. On March 14, he passed away from complications due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). When he was 21, Hawking was diagnosed with ALS and was told he would not live past 25. He would go on to live 55 more years, contributing some of the most influential discoveries in the field of physics.

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