Tue

27

Feb

2018

Superbowl Ad Misuses MLK Speech

 

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Though the Superbowl is a few weeks past, it is profitable to talk for a moment about a controversial advertisement premiered during the game. The spot in question was created by Ram, the automobile company, to promote a line of pickup trucks. Instead, the ad promoted passionate discussions over its voiceover material—a 1968 sermon by the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., titled “The Drum Major Instinct.”

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Pro-Life: The Death Penalty

By: Ethan Starr

 

Over 2,800 Americans find themselves on death’s doorstep. They have not been overcome by powerful maladies, diminished by degenerative disease, or transferred to a hospice home to experience their last days. In only the first two months of 2018, U.S.’s self-inflicted plague has already counted three casualties from the cells of death row.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

“Saint” Lady Bird of Sacramento

by Patrick Stallwood

 

Lady Bird, written and directed by Gretta Gerwig, is a hopeful, character driven, coming of age dramedy set in Sacramento, California during the early 2000’s. The film portrays the complicated relationship between Christine (AKA Lady Bird) and her overbearing and overly critical mother. It also involves subplots about her relationships during senior year and her attempts to go to a college away from her boring hometown. Don’t worry, this piece is spoiler-free!

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Saint of the Issue: St. Paul Miki and Companions

By Jeffrey Lindholm

 

The history of the Christian faith in Japan is often one of toil and martyrdom. The story of Saint Paul Miki and Companions is an exemplary illustration of the plight of Christians in Japan. 

 

Paul Miki was born in 1562 in Tounucumada, Japan to a military family, and was the son of a Japanese military leader. He was educated at the Jesuit college of Anziquiama. Though Miki was the heir to a great inheritance and social position, he was instead drawn to the preaching of the great Jesuit missionary St. Frances Xavier. In 1580, Miki decided to join the Jesuits.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Hallows, Deathly and Otherwise

By: Jack Long

 

The Church stands out in a world of secularism in that it maintains humanity’s ancient tradition of revering the corpses, bones, and artifacts of heroic and (more importantly) holy people, a tradition that can appear strange in a demystified world. There is no denying the historical value or simply the fascinating quality of Christian artifacts such as the Shroud of Turin (bearing the photonegative image of an ancient torture victim alleged to be Christ) or the Portiuncula (a chapel renovated where St. Francis of Assisi lived, worked, spoke with Christ, and died).

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Through My Most Grievous Fault

 

 

by Christian Rodriguez

 

How often do you have trouble forgiving yourself? If you are anything like me, this probably happens a lot more often than we would want to admit. Learning to forgive and love ourselves despite our shortcomings is one of the most herculean tasks we undertake each day.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Dogs Are Not Babies

 

 

 

by Marcus Otte

 

One elementary truth forgotten today: there is no analogy between raising children and caring for pets. It makes no sense to substitute one with the other. Here are some extremely important differences, nearly all of which should be obvious. I will use dogs in my examples because they are the most popular child substitutes:

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Living Authentically

by Jamie Myrose

 

We happen again upon my faith formation classroom in the basement of St. Ignatius Church in Chestnut Hill. This week’s lesson for my 25 little souls is Lent. My co-teachers and I think the easiest way to explain Lent is to ask three questions: what are you praying for, what are you giving up, and what are you doing? When asked, one of the kids responds that she was doing faith formation. While I told her that she should do something she was not already doing, she insisted that this would be her Lenten activity. Her comment got me thinking: were there things that I said I was doing but was not truly living out?

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

On Not Two Gods: A Response to WMSCOG

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

At the height of the Trinitarian controversy in the 4th century, St. Gregory of Nyssa explained his theology on a delightfully short and surprisingly deep work. Written in response to Ablabius, it is known alternatively as Ad Ablabium and On Not Three Gods. For anyone looking for a short work on the Trinity which does not oversimplify or shortchange the doctrine, there are few works more worth reading than this one. Nyssa—who was called “Father of Fathers” by the Seventh Ecumenical Council—rejects the opposite extremes of polytheism and Unitarianism to provide an authentic Christian explication of the Trinity.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Maintaining the Rights of the Lowly and Destitute

 

by Annalise Deal

 

Recently, the Bible study I am part of read Psalm 82—a passage familiar to many who are passionate about working for social justice. At first, I struggled to find much new meaning in the passage in which God commands other powers and principalities who “show partiality to the wicked,” to instead “give justice to the weak” (v.2-3). In this song of Asaph, like many of the Old Testament prophet texts, God admonishes rulers for being corrupt and concerned with gaining wealth and military power rather than with protecting His vulnerable chosen people. The first four verses in particular are a clear and classic example of God’s preferential option for the poor.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Vatican Sends Delegation to the Olympics

by: Noella D'Souza

 

The 2018 Winter Olympics marks the beginning of a new, concerted effort to build the relationship between the Vatican and the International Olympic Committee (IOC). As in the past, the IOC invited the Vatican to send delegates to represent the nation. The Vatican obliged as a gesture of goodwill and show of their support for reconciliation between North and South Korea. Monsignor Melchor Sánchez de Toca, Undersecretary and Head of the Culture and Sports Section for the Pontifical Council for Culture and a former pentathlete, was designated the official delegate. The ceremony was also attended by Stefano Calvigioni, a member of the Italian Olympic Committee who has also worked with the Vatican.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

McMullen Museum Opens Hymns to Nature Exhibit

by Natasha Zinos

 

The McMullen Museum is currently presenting Cao Jun’s first exhibition in the United States. Cao Jun: Hymns to Nature features the artwork of contemporary Chinese artist Cao Jun. The diverse mediums used by the artist including calligraphy, watercolors, and porcelain, produce an array of works that each “sing” their own hymn to nature. As the artist said, “The images on my canvases are the hymns I write to nature.”   

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Agape Latte: The Truth About Love

by Amanda Judah

 

When Yvonne McBarnett took the stage on February 13 at Hillside Cafe, everyone could tell this would be a different sort of Agape Latte speech. She danced up to the stage to “24K Magic,” a favorite song of her husband’s, as preparation to share their love story. Ms. McBarnett shares close ties to Boston College, having received two BC degrees and worked for the university since 2002.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Opinions Fly in Final UGBC Debate

by Jack Long

 

On February 11, Reed Piercey (MCAS ’19) and Ignacio Fletcher (MCAS ’20) debated Taraun Frontis (CSOM ’19) and Aneeb Sheikh (MCAS ’20) in Vandy Cabaret Room in anticipation of the Undergraduate Government of Boston College election. 

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Blessed Paul VI to be Canonized This Year

By: David O'Neill

 

On February 6, the Congregation for the Causes of Saints approved a miracle attributed to the intercession of Blessed Pope Paul VI. The approval of the second miracle was the last step in the process of his canonization—all that is left is for Pope Francis to officially decree his approval and set a date.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Bible Nation

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

Dr. Candida Moss, professor of Theology and Religion at the University of Birmingham, gave a lecture at Boston College based on her new book, Bible Nation: The United States of Hobby Lobby. The  February 7 lecture, and the book, explore the role of Hobby Lobby’s founding family in American public life, especially their philanthropic support of the Museum of the Bible.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Parkland Shooting Shocks Nation

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

This February 14, Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday, Nikolas Cruz walked into Marjory Douglass High School in Parkland, Florida and killed at least seventeen people, with many more injured. This horrific event has prompted response from those across the United States as well as a global response to the massacre of innocent lives. A day devoted to the celebration of love and the beginning of Lent turned into one of horror and mourning. The shooting was the third largest school shooting in the history of the United States.

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Tue

27

Feb

2018

Flu Season: Statistics and Liturgical Consequences

By: Adriana Watkins

 

The United States has faced a particularly dire flu season this winter, with the number of cases rising weekly from November into February. All regions of the country have reported higher-than-normal levels of flu activity, according to the CDC, with the expected total of hospitalizations reaching the hundreds of thousands. The peak seems to be leveling off, though officials warn the flu will still continue to circulate in the weeks to come.    

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