Tue

26

Sep

2017

Philosophical Applications on the Road to True Freedom

 

 

 

by Jacqueline Arnold

 

The concept of human freedom—at least in today’s society—is often an abstract, theoretical concept whose definition is variant and may change depending on different situations. This complicates any attempt for governments to create national laws and, furthermore, for any kind of international treaties or resolutions to be made. For laws, treaties, and policies that respect the dignity of the person to be implemented, a widespread understanding of true freedom is essential.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Morality and “Me”

 

 

by Marcus Otte

 

It is commonplace for Christians to regard relativism and skepticism as the principal cultural challenges that face catechesis today. And this is not without good reason. But I want to suggest these are not the most fundamental sources of secularism, or of confused religion. Relativism is, at heart, a negative doctrine: it denies the existence of objective truth. Skepticism, which denies the existence of knowledge, is likewise negative. And just as negative passions, such as anger or fear, are ultimately grounded on positive passion (e.g., love for something one believes is threatened), negative doctrines rest upon positive ones. The most fundamental layer of a person’s belief system is not what they are against or deny, but what they are for and affirm.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

The Young and the Restless

 

by Christian Rodriguez

 

It is 10AM on a Saturday, and you are walking over to Lower after raging in the Mods the night before. Your hair is a mess, there are stains on your shirt, and the sight of scrambled eggs is enough to make you puke. You sit down to eat, hoping this food is going to cure that throbbing headache when you think to yourself, “What am I doing with my life?”

 

As you try to piece together what happened the night before, the first thing you probably remember is having to yell over the bass line from the host’s crappy Spotify playlist. Thinking about it more, you realize that there were also smiles, there were laughs, there were definitely too many Snaps. 

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

The Struggle of Transition

 

by Chris Reynolds

 

I vividly remember my first day of Kindergarten. I tried to act tough, but I was inevitably the kid with uncontrollable tears streaming down my face as soon as Mom and Dad dropped me off at school. It’s not that I didn’t like my school or friends, but it was clear from then onward that transitions were going to be hard for me. Certainly entering my senior year at Boston College, I didn’t cry when my parents left (at least publicly), but four weeks in, I still find myself struggling to adjust back to this new environment. I am a little taller now, but just like my 6-year-old self, I still struggle with transitions in my life.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

A Reflection for the Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows

 

by Jamie Myrose 

 

 

Death finds you no matter where you are, no matter how inconvenient the timing may be, no matter how recently it last visited you. Last week, I received an email saying that a classmate of mine from high school, Abby, had passed away over the weekend in an automobile accident. A perfectly healthy college graduate dead at 23 years-old. There was no one to blame and no time to say goodbye. This was the seventh death of a loved one that I had experienced since first coming to Boston College.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

The Catholic Church Responds to the Natural Disasters Domestically and Abroad

 

by Cristina Villalonga-Vivoni

 

On Sunday morning after a hurricane made landfall in Texas, Father David Bergeron of the Catholic Charismatic Center navigated his kayak through the flooded streets. Why? To lead Mass and rescue survivors.

 

Father David’s traveling Mass is just one of many examples of the Church’s response to the myriad of natural disasters that has devastated the United States, the Caribbean, and Mexico. As the world continues to respond to the destruction, the Catholic Church has played a crucial role in the relief effort.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

University, Church Condemn DACA Decision

by Ethan Starr

 

The Trump administration’s decision early this month to end the DACA program has faced widespread criticism from University administration, as well as the broader Catholic community. Announced by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the planned rollback of protections from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program endangers the immigration status of around 690,000 residents, some 240,000 of whom are currently enrolled in college. The program, signed as an executive order by President Obama in 2012, aims to secure work permits and education for young adults who came to the nation as children without documents.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Assisted Suicide Law Struck Down in New York

by Jack Long

 

On September 7, the New York Supreme Court unanimously ruled that a constitutional right to aid-in-dying does not exist in Sara Myers v. Schneiderman, a dispute between the End of Life Choices advocacy group and the Attorney General of New York. End of Life Choices sued on behalf of three patients who wanted assistance from medical professionals in committing suicide. Following Penal Law § 120.30, Attorney General Schneiderman would have been required to prosecute any such action; therefore, the patients became plaintiffs and the case made it all the way to the State Supreme Court.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Pope Francis Visits War-Weary Colombia

by Tess Daniels

 

Pope Francis arrived in Colombia for a five-day visit earlier this month, determined to advocate reconciliation and forgiveness to the Colombian people, whose country has been bitterly divided for decades. The country has been torn apart by internal violence between government forces and guerilla militias, most notably the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Yet, in late 2016, the Colombian Congress approved peace accords with FARC. After a referendum for a similar deal failed earlier that year, the government reworked it and both houses of Congress, controlled overwhelmingly by President Juan Manuel Santos’s coalition, passed the deal. About 7,000 FARC rebels left the jungle and began the process of returning to civilian life. However, for many Colombian citizens, the conflict cannot be easily forgotten, and understandably so: an estimated 220,000 people were killed and about 6 million displaced through the decades of violence.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

A Multitude of Selves: Accountability and Taylor Swift

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

There’s nothing like a little vengeance to kick start your day.

 

 

Recently, after the recommendation of a friend, I listened to Taylor Swift’s new song, “Look What You Made Me Do.” Now, I realize this song has been circulating for about a month, and any attempt to address it would seem passé. However, the opportunity to examine these lyrics and discuss their implications is too tempting. 

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Six Podcasts for People of Faith

by Annalise Deal

 

1) Pray-as-you-go

This daily podcast from the British Jesuits offers guided prayer through one of the readings each day. Each episode begins with some kind of music--often a chant, hymn, or psalm. The second part of the podcast offers an opportunity to pray and meditate on the reading through a series of repetitions and questions, that seem to loosely base themselves on the Lectio Divina model. At around ten minutes long, the podcast is loosely designed to be listened to on a commute. It’s perfect for listening to while eating breakfast, walking to class, or as a quick moment of mindfulness in the midst of a busy day. 

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

The Good Place, Or No Exit Revisited [SPOILERS]

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Whenever someone recommends a show or movie about Heaven, I tend to groan. After all, “Things which eye has not seen and ear has not heard, and which have not entered into the heart of man, all that God has prepared for those who love Him,” (1 Cor. 2:9). But, in a break from tradition and after much coaxing, I reluctantly agreed to watch The Good Place.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Communion and Reunion

by Natasha Zinos

 

It might finally be fall, but it is not Halloween yet—or All Soul’s Day for that matter. As it turns out, the Church has not reserved prayers for the dead only to the spooky times of the year. If you are going to understand why we pray for the dead, you will have to understand why we pray at all. Thankfully prayer is not the sort of thing you have to fully comprehend before starting to pray, so let us outline a basic understanding of why prayer matters.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Prayer: The Angelus

by David O'Neill

 

The bells booming from Gasson Hall ring across campus every day from 8 AM to 8 PM. Ringing every fifteen minutes, it is easy for them to slip into the back of our minds as just another part of life here at Boston College.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Saint of the Issue: St. Francis of Assisi

by Lourdes Macaspac

 

October 4 is a widely observed Catholic holiday that celebrates the life, generosity, and kindness of Saint Francis of Assisi, founder of the Order of the Friars Minor (OFM), or the Franciscans.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Liturgy: “Lord, I am not worthy…”

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

“Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the word and my soul shall be healed.” This prayer is not exactly something one would want to say to God. Yet, these words are prayed by Catholics every liturgy before receiving Communion.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Students Express Compassion After Marseille Attack

by Adriana Watkins

 

On Sunday, September 17, four Boston College juniors were attacked with hydrochloric acid while traveling in southern France. The incident, which occurred around 11 A.M., took place in the Marseille-St. Charles train station, and was committed by a mentally-unstable woman. Two of the juniors were injured in the attack, though they are making a full recovery. Meanwhile, the students have been lauded for expressing their compassion towards their attacker, whose illness, said one, “should not be villainized.”

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Race in the American Catholic Imagination

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

On September 11, Bishop George Murry, S.J. of Youngstown, Ohio, gave an address titled “Race in the American Catholic Imagination.”

 

Bishop Murry started his talk by quoting several statistics about the growth and spread of the Catholic Church over the past century: “In 1910, there were 291 million Catholics worldwide. As of 2010, that number was over 1 billion.” He gave particular emphasis to the geographical shift in the Catholic population saying, “Two-thirds of Catholics lived in Europe in 1910. By 2010, only one-fourth lived in Europe.” He went on to say that the Catholic population in Sub Saharan Africa and other regions of the global south have increased dramatically. Despite the increased racial diversity, Bishop Murry said that the Church still has a crippled conscience about race.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

“Ever to Excel” Plan Will Strengthen Catholic Identity

by David O'Neill 

 

At University Convocation on August 30th, Boston College announced a new ten-year strategic plan. The new plan, titled “Ever to Excel: Advancing Boston College’s Mission,” is the fruit of a two-year institutional study and reflects input from all facets of the BC community. The plan outlines four emphases that the committee has decided will work to strengthen BC’s mission. From the outline of the plan, it is clear that one of the main goals is to sustain and strengthen the Catholic, Jesuit identity of the college.The introduction states that “Boston College is committed to being…a Catholic university, called in a particular way to be a meeting place between faith and culture, especially between Catholicism and contemporary society; and a Jesuit university, heir to a spirituality based on the religious experiences of St. Ignatius Loyola that continues to influence Jesuit schools and Catholicism, and the 470-year educational tradition of the Society of Jesus, which stresses the liberal arts, character formation, a rigorous approach to learning, and striving for the greater glory of God.”

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Mass from the Third-Person Perspective

by Jack Long

 

Few colleges give students the chance to see priests spilling off of a stage, but that was not the only thing to be thankful for at Boston College’s Mass of the Holy Spirit.

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Kreeft Explains Objections to Atheism in Lecture

by Amanda Judah

 

On September 21, Dr. Peter Kreeft packed Higgins Hall 300 with students and faculty in a lecture held by the St. Thomas More Society. Kreeft delivered a talk entitled, “I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist: Why I Believe God Exists,” drawing from his fifty years of  experience as a theologian and philosopher at Boston College. His logical arguments were punctuated with jokes and anecdotes that allowed his audience to better process his main points. Afterwards, questions flew at the professor for almost an hour, proof that his words were certainly thought-provoking. 

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Gratitude in the Darkness

 

 

by Hadley Hustead

 

 

A few years ago the Lord encouraged me to start looking for Him in small places and ordinary moments. I was enchanted by the task and decided I would write them down every night before bed to keep record. It quickly became addicting— my secret game with God. I started to realize things like retrieving warm clothes from the dryer, using Windex on a dirty window, and breaking the spine of a new book were more than sensations, they were little gifts of joy from God. My new hobby of recognizing glory in the tiny things taught me that God is constantly and lovingly orchestrating moments of small joy and contentment around every corner.   

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

A Sunday in Montgomery

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

In early June, a few of my friends and I travelled down to Montgomery, AL for our friend’s wedding. The wedding was beautiful, Montgomery was amazing, and the food was delicious all around. The wedding was on Saturday, so everyone in our friend group booked tickets home for Sunday, except for me and one other friend. Because virtually everyone we knew in Montgomery was suddenly gone, we found ourselves asking the question, “What’s there to do on Sundays in Montgomery?” Apparently, the answer is “an epic quest to discover a restaurant that’s not closed.”

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Tue

26

Sep

2017

Walking the Talk

by Annalise Deal

 

This past summer, I had the pleasure of working at GLIDE, a United Methodist Church and non-profit foundation in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. Though GLIDE is in part a church, more so it is a beloved community of people who seek to be radically inclusive and love unconditionally. Not everyone at GLIDE believes in God, but as a body, they live out the teachings of Jesus in a uniquely action-oriented way. Built into their core values is the notion that as people committed to justice and inclusion, we all must “walk the talk.” This idea of walking the talk—of not just holding beliefs and spiritual ideals but actually acting on them—challenged me to re-examine the way I live as a Christian. 

 

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