Wed

29

Nov

2017

Panelists Discuss the Crisis in Venezuela

by Susanna Mykoniatis

 

What began as a recession in Venezuela has resulted in the worst economic crisis in the country’s history —a crisis that is also political, social, and even humanitarian. But what are the effects of this crisis, and what does the future of the country look like?

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Vatican Holds Conference on Human Trafficking

by David O'Neill

 

Though it is impossible to procure exact numbers (most estimates range between 25 and 46 million), it is understood that the amount of people in slavery is likely at an all-time high. Not only that, but it is a growing industry. According to the International Labor Organization, human trafficking is a $150 billion-a-year industry. Recognizing this crisis as an attack on human dignity and a grave moral crime, the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences hosted a workshop with the Global Alliance for Legal Aid. The workshop brought together human trafficking survivors, clergy, religious, and international lawyers all focused on one common goal: the eradication of human trafficking. The goal of the workshop was to formulate a “Victims Charter”, a document that would clearly lay out the rights that victims have and give a framework for reintegration into society. The founder of the Global Alliance for Legal aid, a US based association of lawyers that provides legal help to third world countries, talked about the need to focus on helping victims after they are liberated as well as before. She was quoted in an article by Catholic News Agency as asking, “How is this person going to restart their life?”, noting that victims are often left with a “slew of problems” such as mental trauma, physical impairments, poor education and lack of employable skills.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Pope Francis Issues Clarifying Letter

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

Pope Francis issued a letter to Cardinal Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship, on October 15 correcting and clarifying a commentary falsely attributed to the Cardinal.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Acts of Violence Prompt Concerted Response from Church Leaders

by Lourdes Macaspac

 

On October 31, a 29-year-old Uzbeki man, Sayfullo Saipov, attacked civilians with a rental truck, killing at least eight people and injuring a dozen more. According to eyewitnesses, “he allegedly drove about a mile along a busy bike path near the World Trade Center at about 3 p.m. Eastern time before he slammed into a school bus”.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Bishops of Pakistan Declare Year of the Eucharist

by Jack Long

 

In an officially Muslim country plagued by sectarian violence, the Pakistani Catholic Church took a bold step and announced that an upcoming celebration of a Year of the Eucharist. The Year starts November 26th, 2017 and ends on November 25th, 2018, the Feast of Christ the King.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Campus Ministry Launches New Men’s and Women’s Retreats

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

If one looked at the last year’s Campus Ministry retreat schedule, one would see Ignite (for freshmen), Halftime (for upperclassmen), Manresa (for mostly juniors and seniors), and Kairos (for all grades). There was nothing offered exclusively for men or women—until this year.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Kinship Across Borders: Catholic Ethics and Migration

by Tess Daniels

 

Immigration remains one of the most hotly contested topics in our current political climate. In her lecture “Kinship Across Borders: Catholic Ethics and Migration,” Boston College Theology professor Kristin E. Heyer reworked the narrative to include Catholicism, describing the numerous dimensions a Catholic perspective adds to the immigration narrative. Heyer reevaluated immigration and migration not in the usual partisan manner, but with a scope that encompasses the humanity of migrants.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Fr. James Martin Outlines Ideas for Inclusion

by Adriana Watkins

 

On Sunday, November 12, Fr. James Martin, S.J., visited St. Ignatius Parish to lecture on methods of LGBT inclusion. The talk, which was well-attended, drew interested members from both the St. Ignatius community and the Boston College student body. The lecture was based on Fr. Martin’s recently published book, Building a Bridge, which identifies ways in which “the Catholic Church and the LGBT community can enter into a relationship of respect, compassion, and sensitivity.” He elaborated on each of these three aspects individually, attempting to describe his own vision for dialogue and acceptance.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

“You All Take Yourselves So Seriously”

by Natasha Zinos

 

The weekend before Thanksgiving, the Boston College Theater Department presented The Cherry Orchard on the Robsham Main Stage. This story of an aristocratic family developed themes of home and kinship that are especially suitable for the holiday season. The play was advertised as a comedy, a gesture toward Anton Chekhov’s insistence that this play was not the tragedy it was presented as in its first performance in 1904.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Spirit of Chesterton Left Out of BBC’s Father Brown

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

G. K. Chesterton's stories of Father Brown, the Catholic priest who happens to be an amateur detective, are wonderful short stories saturated with Chesterton's wit and filled with his charming prose, so I was extremely excited when I found out that the BBC had a TV series based on the stories. However, I ended up extremely disappointed.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Stranger Things on Heaven and Earth

by Jack Long

 

Spoiler alert, Stranger Things is not a secret Christian allegory (really though, spoilers ahead). There is no Christ figure, and no stand in for the Father. Stranger Things lacks any hint of Christianity outside of the Christmas lights, a church funeral, and the ever-gnawing fear of the forces of darkness.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Christian Art at the Museum of Fine Arts

by Ethan Starr

 

If you have ever visited the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), you may have gotten lost within the three-floored, five-winged building. Maybe you have been unable to find that one painting you were looking for among the 450,000 artworks held within the Museum. Or perhaps, after wandering through the contemplative Japanese garden, Tenshin-en, you never even made it inside the building. Individuals searching for Christian art throughout the museum have likely experienced significant confusion while trying to find religious art that resonates with them. I have compiled a list of five “must-sees” for Christian art enthusiasts visiting the museum. These works draw from a number of genres and time periods, but comprise only a small percentage of the great collection of religious art that the MFA has to offer.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Faith in Action: Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice

by Vanessa Ruiz-Wiarco

 

Before I attended the Ignatian Family Teach-In in Washington D.C., I had never given much thought as to how my Catholic faith reinforces the idea of social justice. There has always been the incessant teachings of our parents or school teachers who remind us to “Do unto others what you would have them do unto you,” but the application of this principle is more complex than the Church, or even the United States government, has taught me it could be. The Teach-In allowed me to analyze Scripture and apply the teachings to the social issues of immigration and mass incarceration and how they should be tackled through a Jesuit Catholic approach.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Friendship: What, Why, and How

 

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm & Adriana Watkins

 

“Friendship,” C. S. Lewis writes. “Is born at the moment when one man says to another, What! You too? I thought that no one but myself…

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

The Sin Of Sexual Harassment

by Annalise Deal

 

In the last couple months, allegations of sexual harassment and assault have dominated the news, from Hollywood to Washington. However, the recent accusations against U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore have led to some difference of opinion among some Christians. Judge Moore has been accused by several women of making sexual advances on them when they were teenagers in the 1970’s and he was a 30-something local politician. Two of the women, Leigh Corfman and Beverly Nelson, have said that Moore sexually assaulted them. In the wake of these accusations, Alabama State Auditor Jim Ziegler attempted to defend Moore by noting that he did not attempt or engage in sexual intercourse with the women, and by using the Bible to defend the ages of the women at the time of the incidences. Ziegler told the Washington Examiner “Take the Bible…. [T]ake Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus.” This argument is problematic from a Catholic perspective for two reasons: because it misrepresents the relationships between the Holy Family, and because it assumes nothing harmful about Moore’s relationship with and assault of teenage girls.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Building and Burning Bridges

 

by Christian Rodriguez

 

For those of us who identify as queer or have friends in the LGBTQ+ community, James Martin’s recent talk on inclusion in the Church may have come as a welcome surprise. Long have queer-identified people waited for a welcoming hand to reach out to them, especially when the news is filled with stories of bishops denying funerals to gay Catholics and queer people being fired from their jobs in Catholic institutions. Martin and those who stand with him have given queer Catholics reason to hope.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Talents and Investments

 

by Chris Reynolds

 

It can be a fun exercise to look back on how I used to process certain aspects of my faith, and how my perspectives have changed throughout my four years of theology education at Boston College. Attending Mass is one of these perspectives that has shifted, and one which I am reminded of each week. This obligation, which used to be about satisfying the desires of my parents and God, has shifted to my opportunity to be part of a consistent faith community and spiritual practice. Community worship in Mass satisfies my deep spiritual reserves, and can calm my spirit. In a way, it has become my weekly reset button.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

If Naturalism is True, Religion Should Not be Blamed for Suffering

 

by Marcus Otte

 

One of the chief complaints against religion is that it has been the cause of tremendous suffering worldwide. The crusades and inquisitions are the examples most often cited. Sometimes, it is (quite ludicrously) claimed that “most” wars have been caused by religion. Others worry that religious influence upon legislation is a slippery slope to theocracy, and therefore, to tyranny. The conviction that faith is inherently irrational is a common thread among those who make such arguments.

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

The Importance of “Thank You” Notes

 

by Jamie Myrose

 

After a cumulative 41 days of music over the course of the last four years, I put on my shako on for the final time as the Eagles stormed the field to face the NC State Wolfpack. If you had asked me in high school, I never would have predicted all that the Boston College Marching Band (BCMB) has done for me. I would not have even thought of joining the Band. My small, all-girls high school did not have a band of any kind, and I had never touched a bass drum before arriving at Chestnut Hill. Yet that did not stop the BCMB from welcoming me into their family and helping me develop into a person who can truly call herself a musician.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

“My Life is Mine”

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Scrolling through Facebook recently, I came across a video of a famous actor, who—speaking about their life—came to the conclusion that “my life is my own.” I don’t mean to comment on the particular context of the actor’s speech so much as to focus on that phrase alone. When I heard those words, my mind went to the parable of the rich man in Luke 12:16-21, who also thought to himself, “my life is my own,” and “Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry” (Lk. 12:19). It would not be so, however. The Angel of the Lord informs him that he will die that very night (Lk. 12:20).

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

The Beauty Of Being A Woman

by Annalise Deal

 

Recently in a Bible study I attend, we had some time to express what we are thankful for, in the spirit of Thanksgiving. As I thought about the beautiful ways God has worked in my life this semester, I kept coming back to one theme: the experience of being a woman. It sounds cheesy to say that I am thankful for sisterhood, or something like that, but really I am. This semester has been one in which I have been blessed in incredible ways by the many strong, intelligent, thoughtful, and caring women in my life. Being in all-women spaces has at times reminded me of the struggles we still face in the world, but more than that it has reminded me of the gift it is to be a woman and to know God in that unique context.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

Always With Us

 

by Jacqueline Arnold

 

 

Community. The world is made up of communities of all types, centered around all sorts of things: hobbies, sports, academic disciplines, work, and faith.

 

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Wed

29

Nov

2017

A Fruitful Discipline

 

by Hadley Hustead

 

At Boston College, daily Mass is extra accessible, so three years ago I went every day during Lent. Leading up to the season, I was a quintessential bored Catholic. I had a feeling Mass was important, but my mind was never really in it. I didn’t have any expectations besides a hopeful desire to become more engaged in what the Catechism refers to as the “source and summit of Christian life.” However, it ended up becoming a special experience and I met God in a totally new way.

 

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