Wed

29

Mar

2017

Jewish Graveyards Vandalized

by Quentin Bet

 

Over 100 tombstones were defaced, damaged, or toppled at the Mount Carmel Cemetery of Philadelphia in late February. Unidentified perpetrators vandalized this Jewish burial ground, and though their motivations are unknown, authorities suspect anti-Semitism as the driving force.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch Undergoes Confirmation Hearings

by Sofia Infante

 

Beginning on March 20, the Senate Judiciary started confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch, a judge on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeal who President Donald Trump nominated to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. During the Senate hearings, Gorsuch portrayed himself as a judge who favored the law over political parties. “I’ve ruled for disabled students, for prisoners, for the accused, for workers alleging civil rights violations and for undocumented immigrants,” Gorsuch said during the hearings. “Sometimes, too, I’ve ruled against such persons.”

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

AHCA Pulled from Voting in House of Representatives

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Following campaign promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), President Donald Trump—in conjunction with Speaker of the House Paul Ryan—introduced the American Health Care Act (AHCA) or Trumpcare on March 6. The bill was originally announced as the first of three pieces of legislation which would complete the transition from the ACA and effectively repeal it.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Four Years of Francis

 

 

by Katie Daniels

 

“Thinking of the next pope,” then-Cardinal Bergoglio wrote before the last papal conclave, “he must be a man who from the contemplation and adoration of Jesus Christ helps the church to come out to the existential peripheries.”

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Extra, Extra: The Best News in the World

 

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Everywhere we look, there’s news. Televised broadcasts, online articles, nicely printed papers like this one—countless voices crying out, “You need to know this.” Sometimes a piece of news divides our lives in two: before and after. That is the story of the Annunciation. Commemorated on March 25, this feast commemorates the angel Gabriel’s announcement of the Incarnation to Mary, resulting in the most bizarre headline of all time—God becomes Man.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

A Catechumen’s Journey to Becoming Catholic

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

Over the past year, I have had the pleasure of journeying alongside someone who is going through the process of the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (RCIA) program. Gwyneth Howard, a senior in high school in Cleveland, Ohio, made the decision about a year ago to enter the process of becoming Roman Catholic. Through Saint Raphael Parish in Bay Village, Ohio, Gwyn has spent the past year completing the RCIA program offered there.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Euthanasia Debate

This Catholicism 101 special feature is part one of a debate between the editorial staff of The Torch.

To see the rebuttals from each side, please click here.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

“We Must Be Pilgrims”: Saint Francis Xavier and Discernment

 

 

by Libbie Steiner

 

 

On April 7, 1545, in Negapatam, India, the Jesuit Saint Francis Xavier wrote these words to Father Francisco Mansilhas: “May God our Lord grant us in time the gift to perceive his holy will. He wishes that we should always be ready to fulfill it whenever he manifests it to us and lets us feel it within our souls. To fare well in this life, we must be pilgrims ready to go wherever we can serve God our Lord the more” (The Letters and Instructions of Francis Xavier, translated by M. Joseph Costelloe, S.J.).

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

The Impracticality of Faith

 

by Laura McLaughlin

 

Naturalists will often try to “explain away” religion by reducing it to a more advanced form of the altruism also found amongst animals. They argue that groups of people who worked together instead of only existing in a state of ruthless competition were more likely to survive, and so passed on the genes and cultural practices, transforming humanity from selfish cavemen to charitable gentlemen. This seems logical, and from experience we know that we cannot only rely on ourselves if we are to survive. And we do indeed see animals help one another: penguins huddle together to keep warm and take turns being on the outside of the huddle, gorillas groom each other, and many mammals care for their young with what appears to be almost human intimacy. It appears that religion is simply a natural phenomenon if religion is essentially altruism.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Not a Thing to be Grasped

 

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

The Feast of the Annunciation always compels me to give some thought to Our Lord's Incarnation. It is such a strange thing. In fact, if it does not jump off the page to you, if you are not utterly confounded by the idea, I would humbly say that you do not understand it as well as you could. In the Republic[1] , Socrates rejects the possibility that any of the Greek gods would ever accept to be embodied, because that would entail going from a more perfect mode of existence to a less perfect one. The understanding of the body is different between the Platonic and the Biblical worldview, but Plato’s claim is true of the Christian God a fortiori[2] . The Greek gods are far from perfect, not only for reasons that Socrates rejects, but also due to their conception as such. They are multiple, finite, created, and limited. The Christian God, on the other hand, is the Creator. He is one, infinite and infinitely perfect, and omnipotent. Why would such a God accept to do such a thing as to take on a form infinitely lower than Himself?

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Overwhelmed by God

 

 

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Recently I had the opportunity to go on a Kairos retreat, which was both wonderful and overwhelming. My leader that weekend helped me to connect the feeling of being overwhelmed in the Connors Center, with a similar overwhelming feeling I had three months ago.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

A Life of Faith

 

 

by Andrew Craig

 

“I have never been to the funeral of someone I do not know,” said one of my friends as we gathered in St. Ignatius Church. It had been awhile since I went to a funeral of someone I did not know. However, this service was different. Even though I never had the blessing to meet Reverend J. Donald Monan, S.J., I had read and heard about him enough to understand how important he was to BC and to everyone he came in contact with.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

God Doesn’t Use Google Calendar

 

by Eileen Corkery

 

Do you use Google Calendar? If you do not currently use it, be careful—for better or for worse, it will change your life. A free time-management app for smartphones, Google Calendar allows users to create and edit events with the tap of a finger. Have an important appointment you can’t forget? Google Calendar will send you a push notification. Forget the time of your club meeting on Saturday? Use Google Calendar to view an itinerary of your entire week. The app can add virtually any planned event into your schedule—meals, television, even sleep.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Film Review: Jackie

by Hadley Hustead

 

Last year Jackie, a movie written by Noah Oppenheim and directed by Pablo Larraín, gave Americans a view of Jackie Kennedy’s grief and resilience in the aftermath of her husband’s assassination. Natalie Portman’s raw portrayal of Mrs. Kennedy asks the viewers to contemplate how she managed to survive the days following JFK’s death with unspeakable grace and courage. The film’s spine-chilling score and jolting scene shifts leave viewers anxious but enchanted.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

How Lent is Celebrated Around the World

by Armen Grigorian

 

When you think of the Lenten season in the United States, a few traditions come to mind: Not eating meat on Fridays, giving something up, or even doing something extra as a reminder that this is a holy time of year. While these traditions are all very familiar to us here in the U.S., all over the world, different people and different cultures are observing Lent in their own ways.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Snow Days: Is Leisure a Virtue?

by Eileen Corkery

 

“BC Weather Alert. Because of the storm forecast, Boston College will be closed tomorrow, March 14th.” A little after 10:30pm, screams and cheers echoed across Upper Campus as students received the coveted snow day text from the Office of Emergency Management. Homework was thrown aside and quickly forgotten in the Cheverus Hall lounge. In Kostka Hall, freshman girls danced in the hallway. Meanwhile on Lower Campus, celebrations commenced in the mods.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Fr. Monan, S.J., Beloved Former BC President, Dies at 92

by Libbie Steiner

 

The 24th president of Boston College, Rev. J. Donald Monan, S.J., passed away on March 18 at the Campion Center in Weston, Massachusetts at age 92. Aside from being remembered as an extraordinary man who treated everyone with warmth and respect, Fr. Monan is credited with preventing Boston College from falling into financial crisis and guiding the university towards the national recognition it enjoys today as one of the leading Catholic universities in the country.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

BC’s Lenten Retreat: “Lift Every Voice!”

by Bianca Passero

 

Boston College Campus Ministry hosts a Lenten retreat every year. This retreat is free, takes place on Boston College’s campus, and lasts for 40 days. The retreat has three components: prayer, companion, and gathering. For prayer, students who participate commit themselves to 20 minutes of prayer each day. Participants also receive a Lenten reflection in their email inbox each morning to guide their prayer throughout the day. They are also assigned a spiritual companion whom they meet with every week throughout the retreat. Companions are faculty, staff, or Campus Ministers here at Boston College and are a great resource for participants. The spiritual companions are available to talk about whatever the participants want to. Topics typically include the student’s prayer life and how to improve it, life experience, and methods of furthering their relationship with God in all aspects in their lives.

 

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Annual Cronin Talk Provides Perspective on Dating

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

The annual Kerry Cronin dating talk has been a staple event at BC for the past several years. It never fails to pack the lecture hall to full capacity with eager students, most of whom are freshmen. Full of jokes, casual tone, and ability to connect with students, Professor Cronin engaged the audience in conversation regarding dating, a topic she says is often avoided within the BC community.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

BC Students Visit Jamaica for Service Experience

by Ryan Kapopoulos

 

 

Jamaica Magis is a service immersion trip through Boston College’s Campus Ministry, led by Father Michael Davidson S.J.. I recently went on the Spring Break trip to Kingston, Jamaica with 22 BC students. During the week each student is assigned to a classroom to serve as a teaching aid at Holy Family Primary School (grades 1-6) in Kingston. After school and on the weekends, there are a whole host of other unique service opportunities. Some of these include serving at various Mustard Seed communities, and institutions such as the Missionaries of Charity and the Missionaries of the Poor.

Read More

Wed

29

Mar

2017

Arrupe Spreads Awareness of the True Costs of U.S. Immigration Policies

by Luke Heineman

 

It is nearly impossible to accurately determine the number of people that die attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. One method of doing so involves counting human remains in the desert which, from October 2000 to September 2014 in southern Arizona alone, was over 2,700. The causes of death are numerous but equally horrific: succumbing to heatstroke, dehydration, heart attacks, snakebites, or falling from cliffs, just to name a few. Additionally, it is likely that there are still hundreds of more remains buried in the desert, never to be found.

 

Read More

BC Torch on Facebook Visit us on Facebook


Trending Articles

We are an Easter People

by Jeffrey Lindholm