Tue

28

Jan

2014

Liturgy: The Forgotten Liturgy

by Jay Chin

 

What comes to mind when someone says the word liturgy is the Eucharistic Feast where the Sacrifice of Christ is made present again. The Latin Church calls this the Mass, which comes from the Latin word misere. In the Byzantine Church, it is called The Divine Liturgy among the Saints John Chrysostom, which is a codification and shortening of the Liturgy of St. Basil. However, this is not the only kind liturgy. The other liturgy is the Liturgia Horarum, the Liturgy of the Hours.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Catholic School “Survivor”

by Chris Canniff

 

This week all across the nation, Catholic schools are celebrating their heritage as part of the annual National Catholic Schools Week. I have been in the system, so to speak, for nearly my entire life, and I owe just about everything that I am to my Catholic education.

 

I first walked into a classroom in September of 1995, at the age of three. In just a few short months at the age of 22, I will walk into Alumni Stadium to receive my diploma from Boston College. Nevertheless, my journey through the halls of Catholic academia will not end there. I will be returning to BC in the fall for a master’s program in

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Pope Francis and International Relations: A New Diplomacy of Dialogue

Photo courtesy of Lee Pellegrini
Photo courtesy of Lee Pellegrini

by Fr. Charles R. Gallagher, S.J

 

 

 

Charles R. Gallagher, S.J. is an assistant professor in the Department of History. His latest writing is “The Roman Catholic Church and Modern Terrorism: Ideology, Human Rights, and the Hermeneutic of Discontinuity,” in Socialist History.

 

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Creation and Anthropology: Biblical Understandings of What it Means to Be Human

by John A. Darr, Associate Professor of Theology

 

John Darr is an Associate Professor in the Theology Department at Boston College. Darr received his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University and joined the theology faculty in 1988. He is a United Methodist, and his research interests include the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, literary criticism and theory, Biblical characters and characterization, and Synoptic relations.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Trappist Monastery in Massachusetts Begins Brewing Beer

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Trappist ale has long been a favorite with beer aficionados throughout the world. Particularly in the last two centuries, the distinctive ale has gained great notoriety for being one of the few products that has largely remained the same both in recipe and brewing practices since roughly the 1600’s. The name ‘Trappist’ comes from the French monastery of La Trappe in Normandy, where the monks first decided to brew beer which would be sold to the public in order to help support the monastery and to provide them with means to help the less fortunate in their community. Following the great success of the monastery of La Trappe, Trappist monasteries started blossoming throughout Europe. After the French Revolution and the two world wars, however, many of the monasteries were destroyed, damaged, or simply unable to continue their production of the beloved ale.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Guidepost: He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not

by Nikki Elliott

 

“I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with unfailing kindness.”

Jeremiah 31:3 (NIV)

 

I have memories of elementary school recesses spent lying in the grass with friends, daydreaming about childhood crushes, and picking petals off wild daisies while chanting, “he loves me...he loves me not.” We entertained ourselves with this game until we picked every flower we could find or pulled off the last flower petal accompanied by the coveted “he loves me!

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Faith on the Field

by Natalie Yuhas

 

Boston College football changed for the better this past season. After a disappointing combined total of six wins in the last two seasons, Boston College hired a new head coach, Steve Addazio, in December 2012. Addazio revamped the football program through his recruiting and use of social media. In just one season, Boston College football has turned into a winning team, ending with a 7-6 record, the opportunity to play in the AdvoCare V100 bowl, and a Heisman nomination for senior Andre Williams. Among all of these impressive improvements was Addazio’s addition of a new tradition for the football team on game day.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Saint of the Issue: Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati

by Margo Borders

 

Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati was born in 1901 in Turin, Italy. From a young age, Frassati showed great piety and was very involved with his faith, including Catholic student groups, the Apostleship of Prayer, Catholic Action, and St. Vincent de Paul Society; he was even a member of the Third Order of St. Dominic.

 

Frassati spent much of his life helping the poor. As a boy, he gave his spending money and the clothes off his own back to the poor people he saw on the street. Through his membership in numerous societies, he was able to serve the poor and address social injustices at the time. He would forgo family vacations in the summer in order to continue serving the poor of his city. Frassati saw Jesus in the poor, and said that he saw “a special light that we do not have around the sick, the poor, the unfortunate.”

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Ecumenism: The Objectivism of True Ecumenism

by Jay Chin

 

There is a widespread misconception that the goal of ecumenism is for the Catholic Church to befriend all the other Christian churches and communities to avoid hard feelings amongst those who call Christ Lord. The guiding phrase for this notion of ecumenism is “live and let live”. However, that is not true ecumenism. Not even the documents of Vatican II say anything like that. But they do say this: “The restoration of unity among all Christians is one of the principal concerns of the Second Vatican Council. Christ the Lord founded one Church and one Church only”(Unitatis Redintegratio, 1). That, for many, is a hard pill to swallow because we all know Christian communities that perform many pious acts and even display holiness better than your average Catholic parish. Why then should they need to join the Catholic Church?

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God

by Mark Hertenstein

 

 

The most famous sermon of the Great Awakening, the most famous in the career of Jonathan Edwards, and indeed one of the most famous in American history, is titled “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.” It is without doubt one of the greatest pieces of rhetoric ever composed. But I sometimes wonder if our American religious conscience would have been better off without it.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Just Another Stupid Human

by Katie Rich

 

One of my favorite authors, Markus Zusak, has a book called I am the Messenger. The premise of the book is that the main character, nineteen-year-old Ed Kennedy, is practically blackmailed into doing good deeds for a bunch of strangers, from stringing up Christmas lights for a poor family to restoring an old pastor’s faith in humanity by rekindling a dwindled congregation’s faith in God. After he helps a teenage girl at a track meet, she asks who he is, that he would do something so kind for a stranger. Ed pauses, and replies, “I’m just another stupid human.”

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

The Elusive L Word

by Natalie Yuhas

 

I love macaroni and cheese. I also love your shoes. My family is awesome and I really love them too. The word is thrown around all the time in our society: love. Although we use the word all the time, you don’t have to be an angsty teenager to be confused about what love really is. Novels, poems, plays, songs, and movies alike have been trying to figure out and explain what love is for hundreds of years, and I can assure you it means more than just really enjoying a nice bowl of mac and cheese. I’m only 19 years old. I’m definitely no love expert, but I do know that it is one of the greatest things mankind exhibits and is a central theme of the Gospels. I have compiled a list of quotes that have helped me think about and process what it means to truly love.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Pro-Life: Abortion and Practicality

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

Abortion has long been recognized to be a harmful procedure. Though resistance to abortion has been presented as a strictly Christian position, the Hippocratic Oath goes against abortion about half a millennium before Christ was born. Of course, the way the Oath treats abortion and euthanasia is one of the major reasons why it is no longer required to be taken in many medical schools. One may wonder at the wisdom for removing the Oath rather than living up to it, but it seems that one’s priorities take precedence.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

An Open Letter to the Pro-Life Movement

by Ethan Mack

 

Last Wednesday, people from all across the nation descended on Washington D.C. to participate in the 40th annual March for Life. Over one hundred thousand marched in the bitter cold from the national mall to the Supreme Court building. The March is held on January 22 every year in remembrance of the day abortion became legal throughout the nation. I have attended the March on two occasions and both times found it to be a fantastic, grace-filled experience. However, there have been several things I noticed during the March which point to some of the overall shortcomings of the Pro-Life movement.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Belgium May Soon Legalize Minor Euthanasia

by Sofia Infante

 

Child euthanasia may soon become legal in Belgium after the Senate voted in favor of a bill that would legalize euthanasia for minors and those suffering from dementia. The bill passed by a margin of 50-17 and must now be considered by the Chamber of Representative, where it is expected to be approved. Efforts to legalize child euthanasia in Belgium had previously been unsuccessfully proposed in 2004 and 2008.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

The Black Puerto Rican Servant of God Moves Closer to Sainthood

by Jay Chin

 

On December 9, Pope Francis recognized the heroic virtues of Servant of God Rafael Cordero Molina, moving him one more step towards canonization, now with the title ‘Venerable’. The cause for canonization of Rafael Cordero began in 2002 with Benedictine abbot Oscar Rivera, who was in charge of presenting the historic evidence and testimonies of his holiness.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Pope Francis Appoints New Cardinals

by Ethan Mack

 

Earlier this month, Pope Francis made his first addition to the College of Cardinals. Nineteen bishops from all around the world were chosen by the Pontiff to receive the “red hat” and join the body that has elected the Pope for centuries. In addition to their formal role at the conclave, Cardinals have historically acted as advisors to the Holy Father.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Kerry Visits Vatican To Discuss Syria, Obamacare

by Elinor Mitchell

 

Early this month, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met with his Vatican counterpart, Pietro Parolin, to discuss conflict in Middle East and the implications of the new nationalized healthcare, among other things. Father Federico Lomardi, a Vatican spokesman, said the meeting was broad and confirmed that Kerry and Parolin, along with aides, spoke specifically about the suffering in Syria and Sudan. Pope Francis and the Vatican have been outspoken proponents of peace in Syria in an effort to protect human rights. The talk came only weeks before the U.N. sponsored peace talks scheduled for January 22nd in Geneva. The conference will hopefully help resolve the rights issues in Syria. Kerry and Parolin also addressed a similar situation in South Sudan. According to the U.N., conflict in South Sudan has left 10,000 dead and another 355,000 displaced.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

The Little Sisters of the Poor V. Sebelius: A Little Victory for an Important Cause

by Alexander Marsland

 

The United States Supreme Court reached a unanimous decision on Friday to extend a temporary order that would allow a religious order of nuns to opt out of the enforcement of the Affordable Care Act’s controversial contraception mandate without having to file a government exemption form. The religious order claims that although the government form grants the possibility of exemption, having to even file it is already participation in the system, and is therefore implicit acceptance of the abortions and contraceptive coverage that the Affordable Care Act mandates. Thanks to the court order, the Little Sisters of the Poor may exempt themselves from the mandate by simply informing the Department of Health and Human Services of their religious objections.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Life as Culture: BC’s Pro-Life Club and the March for Life

by Tara Wengronowitz

 

Boston College is presently home to over 100 clubs and organizations; one of the most noteworthy this past week has been the Pro-Life Club. The Pro-Life Club’s declared mission is to “represent the cause of life both on and off the BC campus.” The group represents this cause by hosting meetings in which members discuss the various issues associated with the Pro-Life movement. The group also contemplates what can be done to promote the “culture of life” on campus.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Facebook Page Promotes Self-Expression on Campus

by Emily Witsberger

 

Near the beginning of the fall semester, sociology major Ricky Scheiber-Camoretti, A&S ’15, began a project combining several of his interests – his yearn to reflect on reality, his love for long conversations with friends, and his fascination with questioning what others consider to be social norms. Over the course of his first two years at Boston College, he had come to realize that everyone has a story to share, and that many students on campus have similar experiences and struggles whether or not they express themselves. Borrowing the camera of his friend Deryn Thomas, Scheiber-Camoretti began going around campus taking pictures of students while asking them questions about their lives at BC – questions of faith, spirituality, and humanity.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

St. Mary’s Renovation Continues on Schedule

by Margo Borders

 

The renovation of St. Mary’s Hall continues on schedule and is expected to be completed in early 2015. The building started restorations in early 2013 and will undergo exterior renovations as well as converting the south wing of the building into University academic space, which will include the Communication and Computer Science departments and the Woods College of Advancing Studies.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

Boston College’s Hidden Gem: the Campus School

By: Alessandra Luedeking

 

On Thursday evening, January 23rd, a prayer vigil was hosted at St. Ignatius by concerned parents for the unstable future of Boston College’s Campus School, a learning institution for children with severe multiple special needs and complex healthcare requirements. The Boston College administration has supported the Campus School for 43 years. However, recent talk of merging the Campus School with the nearby Kennedy Day School, a Franciscan hospital for children, appears to imperil this support.

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Tue

28

Jan

2014

BC Students Spend a Week in Urban Immersion

by Margaret Antonio

 

Every year during the last week of winter break, many Boston College students venture out to various places in the U.S. and Latin America as part of BC’s characteristic “service-learning” programs. Being in a new state or a foreign country to serve and learn about a community is often a potent, eye-awakening experience. However, this year, 18 BC students stayed on campus to participate in “Urban Immersion,” a program that focuses on learning about poverty and homelessness while volunteering in Boston.

 

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