Tue

25

Feb

2014

Liturgy: The Vision of Benedict XVI

by Chris Canniff

 

It has been nearly a year since Pope Benedict XVI resigned the papacy making way for the arrival of an Argentine pontiff whose warm and accessible persona has helped begin a gradual amelioration of the public perception of the Catholic Church in broader society. The perceptual differences between Francis and Benedict, as noted by the media and the general public, I would argue, are not entirely actual. Perhaps in outer form some things have changed, but in their essence they have largely remained the same. Therefore, this seems to be an opportune moment to reassess the entire liturgical vision of Benedict XVI in relation to the liturgical practice of our current Holy Father.

 

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Pro-Life: Human Beings and Human Persons

by Kate Conroy

 

I have often been asked if Peter Singer’s defense of infanticide is a joke. The response to his argument is usually, “Is he being serious?” or, “This is satire right?”

 

Singer is a professor of bioethics at Princeton University, and he is very serious. Although many find his arguments for infanticide repulsive and dismiss him as crazy, they are wrong to do so. Singer’s argument is based in the scientific evidence that there is no significant difference between a fetus that cannot be aborted and a newborn child. He questions why we consider one precious and the other disposable. You might be thinking this sounds a great deal like the pro-life movement’s argument – it does, except for one big difference: Singer believes that “after-birth abortion” should be legal.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Blessed John XXIII National Seminary and Boston College Connections

by Charles J. Healey, S.J.

 

Fr. Charles J. Healey, S.J. is a member of the Jesuit Community at Boston College and has been a member of the University Chorale for roughly 40 years. He is currently professor of systematic and spiritual theology at Blessed John XXIII Seminary and is presently writing a history of the Seminary as part of the observance of its 50th anniversary.

 

 

Boston College has recently completed a successful celebration of the sesquicentennial anniversary of its founding. It is well to note that there is another nearby institution celebrating its 50th anniversary this year that has a number of connections with Boston College. The institution is Blessed John XXIII National Seminary in Weston, MA, founded in 1964.

 

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Ignatian Indifference

by Marina McCoy

 

Marina McCoy is Associate Professor of Philosophy, specializing in ancient philosophy and literature with a particular emphasis on Plato, the sophists, and rhetoric. Her most recent book, Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy (Oxford) was published in October 2013.

 

In Ignatian spirituality, the term “indifference” is central. The idea of “indifference” points back to the “Principle and Foundation” of the Spiritual Exercises, in which “we should not want health more than illness, wealth more than poverty, fame more than disgrace, a long life more than a short one, and similarly with all the rest.” For the purpose of life is to know, to love, and to serve God. Slowly, we learn that all conditions of life can draw us ever closer to Love.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

CDF Prefect Gerhard Müller Created Cardinal

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

On February 22, Pope Francis added nineteen new Cardinals to the roster of the Princes of the Church. Though there is a wealth of themes to talk about in his choices, one notable name among the new group is Archbishop Gerhard Müller, who is currently serving as the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF). Cardinal Müller has been a public and vocal figure in the past few months.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Catholicism 101: Ash Wednesday

by Allison R. Shely

 

A Catholic does not, in fact, have to go to Mass on Ash Wednesday. Nevertheless, churches will be packed this Ash Wednesday, March 5, to mark the beginning of Lent. For the Catholic Boston College student only halfway through Spring Break, this may seem like good news. Why fuss with finding a Mass while on vacation? Why worry about getting an awkward blotchy spot in your tan from where the ashes were? What’s the point of this silly ritual?

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Music: Indiana Jones Would Sing “In Christ Alone”

by Mary Vasile

 

I have a confession to make. I have been singing in the Liturgy Arts Group for close to three years, but when I first encountered LAG at the 9pm Mass in Trinity Chapel, I was not a fan of the song selection. In my defense (I can hear a chorus of outraged voices rippling out before me), I had grown up going every Sunday to a country stone church, with an organ, and a lot of songs set to traditional Irish airs, or strong power hymns like “A Mighty Fortress is Our God.” Here, instead, were all these songs that sounded a lot like “Songs 4 Worship.” From time to time, for reasons unbeknownst to me, a song required a clapping congregation and a swaying choir. I am a very awkward clapper and swayer. Even three years has not helped that.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Protestant Perspective: Luther’s Legacy in Western Christianity

by Mark Hertenstein

 

If someone was to ask me what Luther’s legacy in Western Christianity is, that person would probably expect several different things––reformation, schism, The Freedom of a Christian, 95 Theses, sola fide, sola scriptura, even theology of the cross. I would, however, surprise them by the following quote:

 

“Wir sind Bettler; hoc est verum.”

 

“We are beggars; this is true.” 

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

First Impressions and Final Judgments

by Chris Canniff

 

We are always told how important first impressions are, especially when going for a job interview or going on a first date. Although our good Lord said, “Judge not, that you not be judged,” many people, nevertheless, will make their final judgment about others based solely on their first impression of them. But, oh how wrong we often can be when we do this!

 

I have an unusually good memory when it comes to knowing other people. Even if I meet someone just one time, I often remember their face and their name long after they have forgotten mine, which can make for some awkward encounters around campus when I presume someone remembers me but they actually don’t. And so, since I am capable of remembering my first interactions with someone whom I ultimately form no relationship, just imagine how much more distinctly I remember my first encounters with those who are my friends. I formed an opinion of them in almost an instant, as most of us do, but I surely have been wrong on a number of occasions.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Guidepost: Finding God in the Bookends

by Nikki Elliott

 

“Do not conform yourselves to this age but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect”

Romans 12:2

 

Apart from the “G” word (cough...graduation), the only thing I have come to react strongly to throughout senior year is the superlative “last”—last football game, last time picking classes, last time walking to class as the fall leaves turn, last time having Christmas movie marathons with roommates during study days. To a certain extent, senior year can seem like a series of “lasts", a sad realization that the college experience is fading from tradition to memory. On the flip side, however, senior year has also given rise to what I like to call “bookends”, defining moments of realization about one’s own moral, spiritual, or intellectual transformation.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

The New Frontier of Self-Discovery

by Katie Rich

 

We, the millennial generation, live in a period of self-discovery. Arguably, everything we do is geared in some way towards finding ourselves, creating ourselves, or expressing ourselves. We picked Boston College over the thousands of other institutions out there because we thought it matched our personality (which is ironic, really, because does everyone on campus have matching personalities?). We picked our major because it pulled at our heart-strings, excited that little academic nerd within each of us, or lit a fire under our ambition for success. We’re big dreamers, soul-searchers. We’re afraid to settle for not only anything less than the perfect job or the perfect person, but the perfect version of ourselves.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Catholic and Strong

by Natalie Yuhas

 

As much as I wish I could say I am constantly on top of my work I have to do, the reality is that I procrastinate more than I should. I would rather look at pictures of cute puppies on the internet than write an analytic paper on the economic policy of South Africa. I invest a lot of time into Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Buzzfeed, but nothing compares to how much of my life I waste on Pinterest. Something about organizing the pictures and links however I want really captivates me. There are hours of my life that I will never get back from scouring the endless pages of fashion, food recipes, crafts, and photography. Although I enjoy a lot of the content on Pinterest, there are some posts that really bother me. One post that bothers me the most is a quote that reads: “It doesn’t matter how you’re doing on your finals as long as your future husband is acing his.” I was stunned by not only the message, but also by how many girls were eagerly re-posting it. It’s sad to think that so many girls agree with this degrading message and think it is funny.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Missa gentis humanæ Premieres at St. Ignatius Church

by Allison R. Shely

 

Missa gentis humanæ, a Mass setting composed by the Boston College Music Department’s Professor Ralf Gawlick, premiered at St. Ignatius Church on Monday, February 17, at 8 p.m. Members of the Grammy-nominated Trinity Wall Street Choir, conducted by Julian Wachner, performed the work, written for eight a cappella voices. Just under an hour long, the Mass setting made use of both male and female voices as well as several types of musical texture, including what Professor Gawlick describes as “multi-voiced polyphony, [something] rare in twenty-first-century choral works.” At its conclusion, the audience, which filled the nave of the church, gave Missa gentis humanæ a thunderous standing ovation. A recording by Mr. Wachner and the original performers will be available through the label Musica Omnia this summer.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Lecture Focuses on "The Jewishness of Jesus"

by Alessandra Luedeking

 

On Sunday, February 16, the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning hosted its third annual John Paul II Lecture in Jewish-Christian relations. The lecture was given by the renowned Rev. Dr. Christian M. Rutishauser S.J. of Switzerland. He is the current provincial of the multilingual community of the Jesuit Society in Switzerland. Fr. Rutishauer completed his doctorate at the University of Lucerne and has since published numerous articles and lectures on Jewish-Christian themes in Rome and Munich.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

BC Jesuit, Biblical Scholar Leaves Legacy

by Margaret Antonio

 

 

 

It is difficult to comprehend how one man can write 60 books, edit a renowned journal, serve as a member on various institutional boards, deliver lectures across the states, and write 50,000 abstracts for books in numerous languages, while carrying out pastoral work in two parishes and teaching graduate courses in theology. This is simply a glimpse at the remarkable legacy of Fr. Daniel Harrington, S.J., professor of theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, who passed away on February 7 after a four-year battle with cancer.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Professor’s Dating Talks Challenge BC Culture

by Margo Borders

 

Professor Kerry Cronin gave her famous dating talk called “Bring Back the Date” on February 10 at an event sponsored by the St. Thomas More Society. The next night, she gave a follow-up talk called “Making the Move: Navigating Dating Transitions,” which was sponsored by the Church in the 21st Century. Cronin criticized the hookup culture at BC, challenged the students to go on a date, and spoke about the values that are important in decision-making in relationships.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Campus School to Remain at Boston College

by Alessandra Luedeking

 

On February 7, a decision regarding the Campus School’s location was reached.

Boston College’s Campus School is a learning institution for children with severe special needs and complex healthcare requirements. This past November, the Boston College administration considered merging the Campus School with the nearby Kennedy Day School, at Franciscan Hospital for Children in Brighton. The move would offer the students a new facility with more space and professional staff.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

BC Splash Seeks Passionate Volunteers

by Erin Anderson

 

Free your calendars on Sunday, April 6 and volunteer through Boston College’s Splash for the unique experience of teaching high school students. BC Splash, a student run program, aims to broaden the academic horizons of high school students by offering a wide variety of free courses taught by BC undergraduate and graduate students. This program draws high school students from the Boston area and as far as New Hampshire and Cape Cod who flock to Boston College’s campus to be immersed in the college environment and experience what it means to be an Eagle. The program welcomes 600-1000 students from grades 8-12 whose interests range from those who are highly motivated and excited for college to those who need a new spin on learning to revitalize their enthusiasm for academics.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

New Evidence Suggests the Authenticity of the Shroud of Turin

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 


New research from a group of Italian scientists suggests that the image of the Shroud of Turin was likely caused by neutron radiation during an earthquake in AD 33. The scientists published their findings in a paper on February 11.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Vatican Considers 16th Century Samurai for Beatification

by Libbie Steiner

 

A 16th-century samurai is currently being considered for beatification following last year’s application to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints by the Conference of Japanese Bishops. Takayama Ukon, born in 1552, was baptized at age 12 by Jesuit priest Fr. Gaspare di Lella after his father’s conversion to Catholicism. He and his family were members of the daimyo class of feudal Japan, who controlled vast swaths of land and were entitled to hiring samurai and building up armies. The Japanese Conference of Bishops hopes to at least begin the process of beatification and canonization ahead of the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Takayama’s death in 2015.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

UN Report on Child Sexual Abuse within the Vatican Sparks Backlash

by Sofia Infante

 

A United Nations Committee Report released by the UN Committee for the Rights of Child has ignited a firestorm of criticism from Catholic Church officials and leaders who accuse it of manipulating the child sex scandal to impose secular views and change Church doctrine, while ignoring the Church’s advancements in the area of child protection. The report, released on February 5, called for the Vatican to open its files to public review, enforce mandatory reporting to law enforcement officials, stating, “[The Vatican] has adopted policies and practices which have led to the continuation of the abuse by and the impunity of the perpetrators.” The report also made recommendations concerning the Church’s views on same-sex marriage, contraception, and abortion.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

House Passes Bill to Completely Ban Taxpayer Funded Abortions

by Alexander Marsland

 

On January 28th, the House of Representatives passed a bill to ensure that taxpayers do not directly fund abortions, and to restore the conscience protection regulation that was rescinded in a 2011 executive order. The House voted 227-188 in favor of the bill, primarily along party lines, with the exceptions of 6 Democrats voting for and one Republican against.

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Tue

25

Feb

2014

Ukrainian Christians Stand Firm amid Chaos

by Jay Chin

 

 

As tensions rise between the pro-European Ukrainian populace and the pro-Russian president Viktor Yanukovych, Christians have continuously called for peace and have provided sanctuary and relief for protesters throughout these weeks of violence.

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Mon

17

Feb

2014

UGBC Candidates Discuss Policy, Faith, and Catholic Identity

by Chris Canniff

 

Elections for next year’s president and vice president of UGBC will be held February 18 and 19. Last week, the candidates sat down for a wide-ranging interview with The Torch to discuss several important issues facing the student body.

 

Nanci Fiore-Chettiar and Chris Marchese, running for president and vice president respectively, are campaigning against Lucas Levine and Vance Vergara. Each one of the candidates is a member of the College of Arts & Sciences Class of 2015.

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