Tue

29

Apr

2014

Members of the BC Community Complete Catholic Rites of Initiation

by Margo Borders

 

On Sunday, April 27, the Boston College community welcomed eight new young people into the Catholic Church. The five catechumens baptized were Molly Javes, Daniel Lee, Nicholas Nelson, Kayla Mendonca, and Ashley Brown. The three candidates who completed the profession of faith were David Ellis and Paige Cargioli. Sarah Moritz was confirmed into the Church. The Mass was celebrated by Fr. Joseph O’Keefe, S.J., Fr. Paul McNellis, S.J., and Fr. Don MacMillan, S.J.

 

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Saint of the Issue: Pope John Paul II

by Katie Rich

 

This past Divine Mercy Sunday, April 26, 2014, two 20th century popes were canonized: Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II. Though Pope John XXIII has been dead for 50 years, anyone over the age of 9 has lived during part, if not all ,of Pope John Paul II’s papacy. His was the second longest papacy in Church history and he was the first non-Italian successor of Peter since 1523. Even these facts aside, JPII was loved around the world by Catholics and non-Catholics alike, and his eventful life is certainly noteworthy.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Guidepost: ‘14 Forever

by Nikki Elliott

 

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future.”

− Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV)

 

I’ve never been good with change. I love routines, and I love consistency. So you can imagine my anxiety when I came to BC freshmen year, overwhelmed by the unfamiliarity of college life and the culture shock of living on the East Coast. The excitement and sense of possibility I had all summer in anticipation of freshman year quickly evolved into fear when I realized the naivety of my expectations. Fortunately, I quickly learned that I was not alone, and that all of us were in some way or another

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

The Call to Joy

by Katie Rich

 

They say that April showers bring May flowers. But when April blizzards bring an unending 40 degree drizzle, it’s hard to stay optimistic. The end of the school year should be a time teeming with joy and happiness, no? By this time, Boston has usually shed its snaky winter skin and slithered into a beautiful spring. Salmon shorts and sundress-clad students should be gracing the lawns around campus, making everything feel lighter and that much more collegiate. Finals seem less daunting, graduation more bitter-sweet than just plain bitter, and that mountainous accumulation of reading you’ve been stock-piling since January doesn’t seem as formidable when you can tackle it while drinking iced coffee and soaking up some Vitamin D.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Pro-Life: Incarnation

by Kate Conroy

 

As far as unplanned pregnancies go, the Virgin Mary holds the trump card of surprise pregnancy stories. I’d like to hear one that could beat hers- she was a virgin, so it almost broke up her engagement and completely destroyed her reputation. And this is all during a time when women pregnant out of wedlock were stoned to death for adultery.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Music: Want an Open Heart? Go to an Open Mic.

by Mary Vasile

 

“Who hears music, feels his solitude peopled at once.” –Robert Browning

 

I spent my semester abroad in Cork, Ireland. I lived about a three-minute walk from a church in which there was very little interaction between people. No Kiss of Peace, no uniform Mass responses (people mixed the old and new with regularity), and no universal cadence or rhythm to anything, not even the Our Father, which was taken at breakneck speed. Communion was a free-for-all, and just stepping into the aisle was a leap of faith. To be honest, the atmosphere was a little icy. I don’t think anyone ever really looked over and greeted his neighbor.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

My Religious Pilgrimage: An Agnostic’s Reflection on Eight Years of Jesuit Catholic Education

by Anthony Cossette

 

A casual browse through the Wikipedia page for the “existence of God” shows a plethora of arguments both for and against what one may call “God,” mainly in the theistic conception of the term in addition to others like the deistic and pantheistic. These entail conclusions that are neatly fitted into positions such as theism, positive atheism, negative atheism, strong agnosticism, weak agnosticism, and a whole host of other specious and unnecessary “isms.” My conclusion is that it would be incredibly presumptuous of anyone to pigeonhole me into any of those categories. Here I will explain why.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Protestant Perspective: Ecclesia Semper Reformanda Est

by Mark Hertenstein

 

It was difficult deciding on what topic to write for this final Protestant Perspective. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther, ecumenism, social issues I have thus far ignored, a planned (and unwritten) article on the culture of estrangement in our society. But ultimately it made the most sense to return to what precisely Protestantism means and what the place of Protestantism is in the scope of Christianity. This is the overall project that guided the column for these recent years.

 

When we say “Protestant,” what do we mean? What is the guiding principle of the Reformation? Do we mean a set of fundamentalists, schismatics, anti-institutionalists, or something along those lines?

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Let It Go and Let God

by Natalie Yuhas

 

I’ve always hated change for as long as I can remember. I like to watch movies I have seen before and already know that I enjoy, read books that I’ve read before, and I hate when I come home from college and find that my parents have changed something about our house. I’m still recovering from the fact that my family moved to a new house in a different town when I was in the first grade. So, it’s safe to say that I was furious when Disney released the movie Frozen earlier this year. Disney princesses were a huge part of my childhood. How dare they make two new Disney princesses and mess with the classics. I told myself that I would not go see it under any circumstances and that I would only stick to watching the classics, but then so many people kept telling me how amazing it is and how much I would love it. After a few weeks, I finally cracked and decided that I wanted to go see Frozen during Christmas break.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Chosen for Each Other

by Chris Canniff

 

I will be graduating in a few weeks, but I am not quite feeling the same anxiety that my classmates are experiencing because I will be back at BC next year for graduate school. While the majority of the Class of 2014 will be heading off to different parts of the country and other parts of the world for new schools or new jobs, I will be here living in the same dorms, eating in the same dining halls, studying in the same libraries, learning in the same classrooms, and working with the same professors. Whereas my classmates will be experiencing so many new things, so much will be the same for me. What will be strikingly different, however, is precisely the fact that my classmates will not be here with me.

Read More 1 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Colorado Legislature Abandons Pro-Abortion Bill

by Alex Marsland

 

On April 16th, amidst strong pro-life opposition and declining popular support, Colorado Senate Democrats backed off from a controversial bill that would effectively prevent any regulations concerning abortion.

 

The bill in question (SB 175) came under heavy criticism from Republicans and pro-life advocates for being both overly ambiguous and wide ranging. Sen. Bernie Herpin, (R-Colorado Springs), for example, pointed to the fact that the bill was reactionary and paranoid in sentiment: "It's a solution in search of a problem… There is no one, no evidence that has said there's a denial of things like contraception to women in Colorado."

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

New Vatican Commission Will Advocate for Children’s Welfare

by Libbie Steiner

 

The Vatican has released the names of eight people appointed to the newly created Commission for the Protection of Minors. The members of the Commission include many laypeople and women from different professions and backgrounds, representing a notable departure from the largely clerical makeup of many other Vatican advising bodies. The aim of the new Commission will be first to address the remaining problems in the Church concerning child sexual abuse by priests and then to expand that role to address any problem of child welfare in the wider world.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Popes John Paul II, John XXIII Canonized on Divine Mercy Sunday

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

On the Sunday after Easter, Divine Mercy Sunday, the Church celebrated the canonizations of Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II, two of the most influential popes of the 20th century and among the most important figures in the last one hundred years. It was Pope John Paul II who instituted the celebration of the Divine Mercy on the Sunday following Easter.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

UK and US Fetal Incineration Sparks Backlash Among Pro-Life Advocates and Health Officials

by Sofia Infante

 

The recent discovery that the fetal remains of unborn babies were disposed of by incineration as clinical waste in hospitals across the United Kingdom and the United States has prompted outrage from pro-life advocates who say it reflects total disregard for the dignity of human life. According to an investigation launched by the UK’s Channel 4, the bodies of around 15,500 babies were burned as medical waste and used to heat some of the facilities. The investigation also revealed that 27 National Health Services (NHS) trusts had incinerated fetal remains in the last two years. A report by The Telegraph revealed that Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, one of the UK’s leading hospitals, had incinerated 797 miscarried or aborted fetuses at its on site “waste-to energy facility.” In another facility at Ipswich Hospital 1,001 fetal remains were brought in from another location. The facilities had told the mothers that their child’s body would be cremated.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

He Was The One

by Fr. William C. Russell, SJ

 

Fr. William C. Russell, SJ, a native of Winthrop, MA, entered the Society of Jesus in 1952 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1965. After completing his studies at Boston College and Harvard University, Fr. Russell studied philosophy and theology in France. When he returned to the United States he served as rector of the Jesuit Community at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley in California, president of Cheverus High School, director of admissions at Boston College High School, province assistant for development, province vocation director, and superior of the Patrick House Jesuit Community in Kingston, Jamaica. He is now retired and is a member of the Boston College Jesuit Community.

Read More 1 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Nunz ‘n the Hood

by Mary Ann Hinsdale, IHM

 

Sr. Mary Ann Hinsdale is a member of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Before coming to Boston College in 2000, she was at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA where she taught theology, was the Chair of the Religious Studies department, and served as a Director of Women’s Studies. Hinsdale specializes in ecclesiology, Christology, theological anthropology, and feminist theologies.

 

One of BC’s best kept secrets might be the “Nunz ‘n the Hood”! Lest you think this is some new acapella group, riffing on the 1991 movie “Boyz ‘n the Hood,” I want to assure you that the members of this group comprise the real life “nuns” (more accurately, “Sisters”) who minister here at Boston College as professors, administrators, and staff members.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Pontifical Liturgies of Triduum and Easter

by Jay Chin

 

The Easter Triduum is a three-day period of preparation for Easter, beginning on the evening of Maundy Thursday and concluding with Holy Saturday Vespers. Pope Francis began this year’s Triduum not at the Vatican, but at the Centro Santa Maria della Provvidenza di Roma, a rehabilitation center for the elderly and disabled. There he preached an off-the-cuff homily about Jesus’ Last Supper as a farewell, as a giving of an inheritance, and that part of that inheritance is being a servant, especially a servant of love to others. After the homily, he performed the Washing of Feet ritual with nine Italian men, a 16-year-old youth from Cape Verde, a Muslim from Lybia, and an Ethiopian woman. Pope Francis not only washed their feet, but also kissed them, sometimes bending all the way to the ground for those who were paralyzed. Going out to the less fortunate on Maundy Thursday is a personal tradition of His Holiness, going back to when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires and it is clear that he intends to maintain it instead of celebrating Mass at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran, as was until recently customary.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Father Scott Brodeur Discusses St. Paul’s Teachings on Charisms

by Allison R. Shely

 

On Thursday, April 10, Father Scott Brodeur, S.J., a professor at the Gregorian University in Rome, gave a lecture entitled “What St. Paul Teaches Us About Charisms.” Held in the Heights Room, the talk was co-sponsored by the Center for Ignatian Spirituality, the Roche Center for Catholic Education, and the School of Theology and Ministry. In the beginning, Father Brodeur admitted that a “formidable topic” was at hand. First, he defined some terms and presented their etymological background. The Greek chárisma appears 17 times in the New Testament: 16 in Paul’s letters and once in First Peter. Deriving from cháris, grace, chárisma means “something given out of generosity” or “gracious gift,” which is Father Brodeur’s preferred translation. The New American Bible translates chárisma as “a gift” and other translations render it as “a free gift,” but Father Brodeur called this problematic, for the term cannot apply to gifts given by humans to humans and “clearly [refers to] a divine activity.” Moreover, natural talents and fortunate circumstances are natural, not spiritual gifts.

 

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Fr. McNellis Speaks on the Importance of Men of Good Character

by Alessandra Luedeking

 

On Thursday evening, April 3, students filled the lecture-style classroom in McGuinn in anticipation of Fr. Paul McNellis’s talk, “How Men Become Good Leaders (And Why Women Should Care).” The event was organized by the Sons of St. Patrick and the St. Thomas More Society, both Catholic, student-run groups on campus. The talk centered on the importance of men of good character as the basis for respectable leaders.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Rowan Williams Speaks on “Revelation in the Context of Interreligious Dialogue”

by Margo Borders

 

On Monday, April 7, the Church in the 21st Century and the BC Theology Department hosted Rowan Williams, Emeritus Archbishop of Canterbury and Professor of Theology at Cambridge University. Williams gave a lecture entitled, “Revelation in the Context of Interreligious Dialogue” as a part of an annual lecture series on topics of interreligious dialogue.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Alpha Sigma Nu Holds Panel Discussion on Jesuit Education After Graduation

by Stephanie Johnson

 

On April 2, the Boston College chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu, the honor society for Jesuit colleges and universities, held its flagship event of the spring semester. A panel discussion on the role of a Jesuit education after graduation took place in Higgins 310. The event was organized by the current officers and facilitated by Fr. Gregory Kalscheur, Alpha Sigma Nu’s faculty advisor. The panel was comprised of six panelists including Ashley Duggan, Associate Professor of Communication; Fr. James Keenan S.J., Professor of Theology and Director of the Presidential Scholars Program; Fr. Richard McGowan S.J., Adjunct Professor of Finance and Economics; Tim Muldoon, Assistant to the Vice President for University Mission and Ministry; Tim Mulvey, Assistant Director of the Center for Student Formation; and Fr. James Weiss, Associate Professor of Theology.

Read More 0 Comments

Tue

29

Apr

2014

Theology and Ministry Library Exhibits Pre-Vatican II Pamphlets and Religious Articles

by Margaret Antonio

 

In 1978, William J. Leonard, a Jesuit theology professor at Boston College, began collecting thousands of pamphlets and religious articles about Catholic teaching, liturgy, and lifestyle before the introduction of the Second Vatican Council’s reforms. Fr. Leonard realized that the “implementation of Vatican II reforms would result in an overhaul of the literature and material culture of Catholic religious life.” His collections began the Liturgy & Life Collection at the John J. Burns Library.

Read More 0 Comments
The Torch Logo

BC Torch on Facebook


Trending Articles


Christianity Finds Home in Israel by Albert Barkan


Euthanasia Debate by Annalise Deal and Gjergji Evangjeli


Euthanasia Debate Rebuttals by Armen Grigorian and Libbie Steiner