Wed

25

Sep

2013

Attack on Ancient Christian Town Threatens Rebel Regime’s Legitimacy

by Elinor Mitchell

 

Early this month, Syrian rebels attacked Maaloula, an ancient Christian town northeast of Damascus. Fighting began after rebels seized a checkpoint, which they claim was harming Muslims. Ever since, Maaloula has been the site of a tug-of-war battle between government and rebel regimes. The attack, one that paints anti-Assad rebels as unsympathetic to Christians, complicates the question of whether the United States should take an active stance against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

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Wed

25

Sep

2013

Student Group Raises Money for charity: water

by Chris Canniff

 

In August 2011, Kimmi Vo, CSOM ’14, traveled to Spain with a group of fellow Boston College students to participate in World Youth Day in Madrid and the preceding Magis program hosted in Loyola by the Society of Jesus. Magis is a weeklong spiritual experience designed to prepare Jesuit-educated students for the impending World Youth Day by immersing them in various excursions. Each was different but united by a common use of the Ignatian Examen as a daily means of reflecting on the relations between one’s own unique experiences and spiritual development.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

The Torch is Lit with the Lumen Fidei

by Chris Canniff

 

Back in July, Pope Francis issued his first encyclical letter, entitled Lumen fidei. The document was partly composed by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and was the culmination of his series of encyclicals which addressed the theological virtues – Spe salvi, on hope, and Caritas in veritate, on charity. Unfinished at the time of Benedict’s resignation, Francis took up the work of completing the encyclical letter on this fundamental virtue – faith.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Pro-life: Sex-selective Abortion Endangers Women

by Margo Borders

 

Diseases and poverty run rampant around the globe, yet one of the most life-threatening conditions in our world today is simply being a girl.

 

Sex-selective abortion is defined as the practice of terminating a pregnancy based on the predicted sex of the baby. Sex-selective abortions that target females are still very common in places such as India and China. For example, according to the 2011 census, there are 37 million more men than women in India. Not only is this lack of females devastating to gender equality, but it is also damaging to the cultures and the generations of men that will not be able find wives and start a family.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Origins in Origen

By Margaret Antonio

 

A third century theologian influences the birth of contemplative prayer, a Mozart composition, and the work of an acclaimed American scholar? At first glance, it seems unlikely, like a loosely spun plot out of a Dan Brown movie. However, when over 70 Origen scholars from around the world present years of research at a weeklong conference in Aarhus, Denmark, it’s hard to dismiss. From August 26-30, hundreds of scholars, including Boston College Associate Professor of Theology Margaret Schatkin, gathered to explore “Origen and Origenism in the History of Western Thought.”

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Mass of the Holy Spirit Unites Student Body

 

by Alessandra Luedeking

 

On Thursday, September 12, Boston College celebrated its annual tradition of the Mass of the Holy Spirit, presided over by the University President Rev. William Leahy, SJ, Vice President for University Mission and Ministry Rev. Jack Butler, SJ, and Associate Professor of Physics Rev. Cyril Opeil, SJ. It was sunny, despite cloudy blue skies. The liturgy was observed on the lawn facing O’Neill Library. Chairs were ordered in long rows upon which people sat awaiting the commencement of the academic year through prayer and the Holy Spirit’s guidance.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Wishmakers on Campus

by Natalie Yuhas

 

After two years of planning, Lauren Gray, A&S '14, and Chelsea Healey, CSOM '14, have brought Wishmakers on Campus to Boston College for its first year as a Registered Student Organization. Not only is this new to campus, it is also the first independent college campus club associated with Make-a-Wish® Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Dominican Republic Exhibit

by Emily Witsberger

 

Students studying on the first floor of O’Neill Library this fall can get a glimpse of how service work abroad has impacted some members of the Boston College community. The Level One Gallery is currently displaying a moving exhibit titled Remembering Their Stories: Exploring the Influential Relationships Made through International Service Work. The exhibit, which opened on September 16, is sponsored by the recent Mustard Seed Dominican Republic service trip through Boston College Campus Ministry and The Boston College Libraries. Remembering Their Stories seeks to draw attention to the most memorable parts of service work abroad experienced by volunteers: the people one meets and the relationships one forms. As stated by the collaborators behind the exhibit, its primary aim is to acknowledge all of those people who have had profound effects on Boston College students throughout their time doing service work abroad, both in the Dominican Republic and in other areas across the world. Whether it be a community member, a local person, a supervisor, or even other volunteers, people are integral factors to understanding a country and culture.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Liturgy: The Divine Liturgy

by Jay Chin

 

The Vigil of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross marked the return of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom for the 2013-14 academic year at Boston College. With about fifty faithful in attendance, Fr. Michael Moisin of the Romanian Catholic Church presided over the Vigil at St. William’s Chapel on the Brighton Campus. The Antiphons were sung in Romanian and Greek by Rev. Dcn. Michael Connolly, Archdeacon of the Armenian Catholic Church, and the responses were sung in Slavoric by Lyria, a four-man choice from St. Petersburg. Retired priest Rev. John McLaughlin of the Archdiocese of Boston gave the homily. He reminded the faithful that the Cross is a sign of conquering, blessing and a hope which, as the Pope said, we cannot let anyone rob us of. The cantor, Mr. Adrian Rosca, chanted the Psalm verses, and Mr. Todd Velianski chanted the Epistle. Fr. James Morris of the Ukrainian Catholic Church and Rev. Dcn. John Moses, Protodeacon of the Melkite Catholic Church, also assisted in the Vigil.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Protestant Perspective: Are We Different?

by Mark Hertenstein

 

Through centuries, no branch of Christianity has shown itself especially quick to change or move on many issues. And in some sense that is fine- there is no need to go with the flow of a certain time period, else some forms of Christianity have shown themselves to run off the tracks a bit. That is when absolutes get turned into relatives. Caution and measured response are good for most issues.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Who You Calling a Conservative (or a Liberal)?

by Ethan Mack

 

Could anyone else not stand watching the secular media’s attempt to cover the papal conclave? I honestly had to change the channel to Catholic TV after five minutes for fear of going insane. Usually, that would be the amount of time it would take for an anchor to speculate whether the new pope would be “doctrinally conservative”, like Pope Emeritus Benedict and Blessed John Paul II, or whether he would come from the Church’s so called “progressive wing”. They would talk ad nauseam about the concerns of “liberal Catholics” and how they demand change from the “traditionalist Catholic hierarchy”. These terms: conservative, liberal, traditional, and progressive, are by nature political and therefore, they have no application to describing the Catholic Church.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Set the World on Fire

by Natalie Yuhas

 

“Be who you were meant to be and you will set the world on fire.” St. Catherine of Siena

 

I thought I had everything figured out as a college student when freshman year came to a close. I was comfortable with my group of friends, had figured out how to manage my time, and knew the Newton bus schedule like the back of my hand without TransLoc. Content with how the year had gone, I returned home and started my job as a lifeguard at a fairly empty pool. With so much free time on my hands, I had plenty of opportunities to reflect on my year. Although my first year was incredible, I realized that I wasn’t fully utilizing all that Boston College has to offer. There weren’t many times when I tried hanging out with different people or doing different things and I felt pretty unsatisfied as a whole. I felt like I hadn’t quite found “me” yet.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Guidepost: Grace on the Heights

by Nikki Elliott

 

The child is growing and becoming strong in spirit, filled with wisdom, and the grace of God is upon him. – Luke 2:40

 

Returning to the Heights for the start of a new school year reminds me of how great it is to be an Eagle. Reunions with close friends, the idyllic image of Gasson Hall, an invigorated sense of BC pride with the kickoff of football season, and the anticipation of what the coming year holds brings an air of joy and gratitude.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Viaggio a Roma: Finding God in All Things

by Katie Rich

 

When I stepped into my apartment-style dorm for the first time at John Cabot University in Rome, I had a fairly clear image in my head of how the upcoming months would play out. Until December, I would hold myself to a strict diet of pizza, pasta, and gelato. I was going to throw three coins into the Trevi Fountain, drape myself in a bed sheet and yell “Et tu, Brute?” in the middle of the Roman Forum, take a picture of myself pushing over the Leaning Tower of Pisa, cruise down Venice’s Grand Canal in a gondola, elegantly sample wine and cheese in the vineyards of Tuscany… the list was endless. At the top of the list, and arguably the entire reason I came to Rome in the first place, was seeing the pope. I reasoned that the moment I saw Papa Francesco, any cold doubt I held in my heart would melt away, and my faith would grow by leaps and bounds.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Ecumenism: Concerning the Natures of Christ

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

In 1999, the late Coptic Pope, H. H. Shenouda III, wrote “The Nature of Christ,” a work through which he hoped “to settle this question by attempting to rewrite a satisfactory wording of our faith, which would be acceptable to all.” There is much that all Copts, Orthodox, and Catholics would have to agree with while reading it. Nonetheless, the principal question of the article is to see whether it is possible to maintain that Christ, the Incarnate Logos, had only one Nature, which has been the Coptic Church’s position and the reason for its separation from both the (Eastern) Orthodox Church as well as the Roman Catholic Church. “On the Nature of Christ” is a clear and precise formulation that shows that there is now more possibility than there has ever been for the Coptic Church to join with the Chalcedonian Churches. More than that, it shows that the Coptic Church has given a great push toward the purpose of reunification, a push that needs to be examined and answered by both the Christian East and the Christian West. I do not claim to be a theologian for any purpose, but I believe that a new and more philosophically inclined look into this article will show that there is little more than misunderstanding over definitions in the separation between the non-Chalcedonian and Chalcedonian Churches and, at the same time, that the loose definition of ‘Nature’ on the part of non-Chalcedonian Churches can be harmoniously substituted without causing harm to either side’s theology.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Devil's Advocate: Come, All Ye Heretics

by Anthony Cossette

 

Judging by your confusion at the title of the column and this article, you, dear reader, are perhaps wondering what lies in store for you as you dare to read these not-so-sacred words in a fundamentally Catholic newspaper operating at a Catholic university. Yes, you may require a quick confession and absolution from our friends, the Jesuits, after just one glance at what I have to write about. I assure you, however, that there will be no outlines of satanic rituals to perform or the typical religion bashing that the prototypical atheist savors to accomplish simply for the sake of being an obnoxious provocateur. I believe we have long since grown past the days of witch-hunts that our neighboring Salem used to conduct in the days of yore.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Pope Francis Gives Interview to Jesuit Publication

by Ethan Mack 

 

In late August, the Holy Father, Pope Francis gave a lengthy interview to the Italian Jesuit publication, La Civiltà Cattolica which was translated and published last Thursday in 16 separate Jesuit publications, including America magazine. The article in America, entitled “A Big Heart Open to God,” comes in at a word count of around 1200 and covers issues varying from the pope’s Jesuit spirituality to the role of women in the Church.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Archbishops Respond to Navy Yard Shooting

by Chris Canniff

 

Last Monday, September 16, a lone gunman killed 12 people and wounded eight more at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. The man, 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, was a former Navy reservist with a checkered past of minor infractions of the law relating to violence. He had also been discharged from the Navy in 2011 for a “pattern of misbehavior.”

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

US Catholic Bishops Urge Immigration Reform

by Chris Canniff 

 

Earlier this month, the Catholic bishops of the United States announced a two-month-long nationwide initiative to promote awareness of the need for immigration reform that respects the dignity of the individual persons and the unity of the families who have been victims of the current, flawed system.  Such events as special Masses, prayer services, pilgrimages, and parish talks on the topic are being hosted in dioceses across the country.  Leading cardinals and archbishops have published op-ed pieces on the topic in the New York Daily News, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post among other publications.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Liberation Theology Comes to the Vatican

by Mark Hertenstein

 

In a surprising twist in the complicated saga of Vatican relations with liberation theology, Archbishop Gerhard Ludwig Müller, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (the same position once held by the Pope Emeritus), published an editorial praising that theological movement in the Vatican paper L’Osservatore Romano - alongside that of Father Gustavo Gutierrez, O.P., considered the founder of Latin American liberation theology.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

Reflections on the Mysticism of Saint Ignatius of Loyola

Photo courtesy of Lee Pellegrini
Photo courtesy of Lee Pellegrini

Harvey D. Egan, S.J.

Harvey D. Egan, S.J. is Professor Emeritus of Systematic and Mystical Theology, specializing in the work of Karl Rahner and Christian mysticism.  He was ordained a priest for the New England Province of the Society of Jesus in 1969 and joined the Boston College theology faculty in 1975.

 

 

 

 

Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus ("Jesuits"), is one of the Christian tradition’s profoundest mystics and perhaps its greatest mystagogue. However, his apostolic successes, as well as those of the Society of Jesus from his time to the present, have overshadowed the importance of his mysticism.

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Tue

24

Sep

2013

The Wisdom of Childhood

Professor Peter Kreeft is a widely sought after speaker on Catholic apologetics, and he specializes in the philosophy of religion and the thought of C.S. Lewis. Professor Kreeft has authored over seventy books. He joined the Boston College philosophy faculty in 1965. The following piece is excerpted from his book, “Before I Go.”

 

 

 

I used to be wise. Then I grew up.

 

When I was about eight, I think, I formulated my first general philosophical principle: “a little understanding is better than a lot of suffering.” I still think that’s one of the best rules for a happy marriage. It’s probably even a good rule for international diplomacy.

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