Thu

26

Oct

2017

Loving is Living in Hope

 

by Adrian Rubio

 

Students, faculty, and professionals alike all have their eyes glued on their smartphones, checking for the updates on the most recent news-break or scandal. Everyone seems driven by the desire to get information fast, but to what extent has the immediacy of contemporary communication created an unhealthy need for instant gratification? Our days are too short, too busy, and too overwhelming for us to stop and reflect. Nothing seems more important than responding to that text message or email received a couple of hours ago. We live in times of high standards and expectations, but what exactly do we expect from others and ourselves when we focus so much on the instant?

 

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Global Christian Persecution Escalates

 

by Christina Villalonga-Vivoni

 

Christianity is the world’s largest religion. As of 2015, Christian has approximately 2.3 billion followers and the numbers have increased since the numbers were released two years ago. However, many Christians living in violence-ridden countries or under authoritarian regimes have reported numerous accounts of persecution. As of 2016, close to 600,000 Christians have suffered some form of persecution of faith, while almost 100,000 Christians have been killed for their faith in the past two years.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Paris Statement

 

by Tess Daniels

 

In early October, ten well-known European intellectuals signed The Paris Statement: A Europe We Can Believe In[KD1] , in which they declared that a false and pseudo-utopian Europe threatens everyone and that all must defend the real Europe. This real Europe is defined by solidarity, civic loyalty, and patriotic love for the nation-state.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Las Vegas Shooting Inspires Passionate Catholic Response

 

by Jack Long

 

In the face of the murder of 58 people, the Church has moved to suffer with the people of Las Vegas.

 

In the immediate aftermath of October 1st shooting, the Shrine of the Most Holy Redeemer served as a refuge for those escaping the shooting and soon allowed the police to use its parking lot as headquarters of the investigation. Eight days after the shooting, the Shrine remained closed to allow police to complete their investigation of the shooting.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Church Urges Dialogue in Catalonia

 

by Tess Daniels

 

Catalonia, one of Spain’s 17 autonomous regions, lies in the midst of an independence controversy that has plunged Spain into one of its worst political crisis in decades. Secession in Catalonia has long been controversial, with separatists advocating fervently for Catalonia to become its own sovereign state. In an Oct. 1 referendum, declared illegal by the central government in Madrid, 42% of the eligible electorate cast their ballots, and an overwhelming 90% voted for secession. Police responded to the vote by shutting down polling stations, confiscating ballots, and even using batons and rubber bullets, leaving an estimated 800 people injured. Polling shows Catalans more divided on this issue than the referendum might lead one to believe, with 41% favoring independence and under 50% remaining unopposed.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Cardinal Gives Speech to the UN on Poverty and Social Development

 

by Noella D'Souza

 

On October 2, 2017, Archbishop Bernardito Auza of the Philippines, Vatican ambassador to the United Nations, gave a speech at the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly Debate on Social Development. The Archbishop focused on the impact of global economic growth on those in poverty and the steps that can to be taken to ensure comprehensive economic and social advancement that will last in the interest of the many, especially the marginalized.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Cardinal Burke Reinstated to Apostolic Signatura by Pope Francis

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

Raymond Cardinal Burke of the United States was reappointed to the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura, the Vatican’s highest court. Cardinal Burke previously was prefect of the court for six years. Italian Cardinals Agostino Vallini and Edoardo Menichelli, as well as Belgian Archbishop Frans Daneels and Dutch Bishop Johannes Willibrordus Maria Hendriks were also appointed to serve on the Apostolic Signatura. The Apostolic Signatura functions as the Vatican’s highest court, akin to the Supreme Court in the United States.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

A Roomier Rumi Night

 

by Natasha Zinos

 

I knew very little about Jalaloddin Rumi before “Rumi Night on the Heights,” although I was aware of Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s daughter, Rumi (impressive for someone so far removed from popular culture). So in imitation of any self-respecting academic, I decided to educate myself on the poet to better appreciate him at Rumi night: I listened to a podcast on Rumi and Sufism. That may have given me a little context to understand the poetry in, but I was still unprepared to encounter Rumi in such raw loveliness of his lyrical poetry.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

#TrumpTweets: The Use and Abuse of Media

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

At this moment, you’re one Google search away from Donald Trump’s eight-year Twitter history—a corpus composed of 36,200 messages. Often, even those who don’t use Twitter end up seeing or hearing about these 140-character media bursts, a series of “sound-bytes” that tells us what the President is thinking, doing, or planning. Many users appreciate the updates (Trump has some 41 million followers) while others critique his use of social media (a quick Google search will show you that). While there are strong opinions on both sides, few voices argue that his presence on Twitter is unimportant.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Tragic Impact of Hugh Hefner’s Legacy

 

by David O'Neill

 

On October 27th, Hugh Hefner, the founder of Playboy Magazine, died at age 91. A leader of the sexual liberation movement, the damage that Hefner has incurred on American Society is unfathomable. It is a frightening thought to imagine how many souls were led into a state of sin by viewing his magazine.

Read More 5 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

BC Conference Invites Dialogue on Amoris Laetitia

 

 by Adriana Watkins

 

Sensing a need for increased understanding between clergy and families, Pope Francis released his papal exhortation Amoris Laetitia in April of 2016. The document, whose title means “Joyful Love,” enumerated several challenges facing the modern family. It was intended as a starting point for further conversation, and in a recent symposium, Boston College provided an environment in which to continue this discussion.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Intersection of the Secular and the Sacred in Fifteenth Century Music

 

by David O'Neill

 

On Thursday, October 21, the Jesuit Community and the Music Department welcomed members of the BC community and music aficionados from greater Boston to for a night of timeless music. Held in Saint Mary’s Chapel, audience members filled in for a performance by Blue Heron, the world-renowned renaissance ensemble directed by Scott Metcalfe. Titled “Ma maistresse: Songs, Masses & a Motet for My Lady,” the concert featured the works of the well-known Renaissance composers Johannes Ockeghem, Johannes Regis, and Firminus Caron, and Barbingant.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Red Bandanna 5K

 

by Jack Long

 

In honor of Boston College graduate and September 11 victim Welles Crowther, Boston College held its annual Red Bandanna 5K in front of Gasson Hall.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Land O’ Lakes Turns Fifty

 

by Alexander Wasilkoff

 

On October 11, many prominent figures in Catholic higher education met to discuss the legacy, effects, and future of the fifty-year-old Land O’ Lakes Statement.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

“Mystery in Faith and Physics”: Reflections on Science and Religion

 

by Amanda Judah

 

In his lecture on October 5th, Dr. David Ciampa of the Maine Maritime Academy asserted that “at the foundational level, physics has a kind of mystery about it.” In his appraisal, he was able to draw on experience working at a national lab and at a university. His warm personality appealed to those from either background.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Christian Student Speaks Out at March Against Racism

 

 

by Annalise Deal

 

On Friday, October 20, thousands of Boston College students, faculty, and staff gathered to march in solidarity with black students. The rally was a response to instances of racism the previous week, including the defacing of a Black Lives Matter sign to read “Black Lives don’t Matter,” and a Snapchat of a burnt steak and cheese sandwich with the caption “I like my steak and cheese like I like my slaves.”

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

95 Theses Turn 500

 

by Alex Wasilkoff

 

In the early morning of October 31, 1517, one brave man nailed 95 arguments to a church door, and the world was never the same again—or so the story goes. The truth of the legend surrounding Martin Luther’s 95 Theses notwithstanding, it is hard to dispute the world changing effect that this German monk would have. Luther is often given credit for beginning the Protestant Reformation with his 95 Theses in 1517, and a commonly cited ending is the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, although theological disputes, dialogues, and divisions continue to the present day.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Magnum Principium and the New Liturgical Translation

 

by Ethan Starr

 

In response to the Second Vatican Convention’s goal of increased utilization of vernacular languages in the liturgy, the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) released its first English translation of the Roman Missal in 1973. In keeping with Vatican instruction of the time, the inexact translation sought a “dynamic equivalence” to the original Latin, attempting to adhere to the spirit of the Latin texts without a concern for absolute literality. In its intention of avoiding the sometimes unwieldy, technical language of a literal translation, the ICEL did not always win the approval Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Rome’s regulatory arm concerning liturgical translations. The Congregation’s rejection of a revised 1998 translation by the ICEL sent the clear message to the loose translations that the Congregation was not partial to dynamic equivalence. In 2002, The Congregation for Divine Worship released the instruction Liturgiam Authenticam, which mandated that "the original text, insofar as possible, must be translated integrally and in the most exact manner” to the original Missal. The most recent English translation of the Roman Missal, in accordance with the rigidity of the “formal equivalence” method ordered by Liturgiam Authenticam, was approved by the Holy See in 2010 and adopted by most English-speaking countries by the end of 2011.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Exorcism and Spiritual Warfare 101

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

“BATHSHEBA! By the power of God, I condemn you back to hell!” For anyone who has dared to watch The Conjuring, these were words used to cast out a demon. If only it were that simple. We do not know a whole lot about exorcisms. The Catholic Church says that exorcisms exist, but other than that, scant information is available. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says, “When the Church asks publicly and authoritatively in the name of Jesus Christ that a person or object be protected against the power of the Evil One and withdrawn from his dominion, it is called exorcism” (CCC 1673).

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

A Christian Perspective on Racism

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

The Christian perspective on racism is surprisingly simple to formulate. St. Paul, speaking on baptism, says that it is “a renewal in which there is no distinction between Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave and freeman, but Christ is all, and in all” (Col. 3:11, cf. Gal. 3:28-29). This is not to say that baptism erases ethnic identity, sex, or socio-economic status, but rather that none of these things are an impediment to membership in the Church of Christ and to the reception of the promises of the Lord. Since we have been commanded to “make disciples of all the nations” (Mat. 28:19), it follows that the same is true for any nationality or race.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

On Race and Religion

 

by Christian Rodriguez

 

Christians can be terrible at encountering others. So often we are the ones who play into the proverbial culture wars. You are either a traditionalist who sees the reforms of Vatican II and Pope Francis as the beginning demise of the Church or a social justice minded progressive who is loose with Church teaching.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

Finding Fellowship

by Christopher Reynolds

 

This weekend, I had the opportunity to go on a male mentorship program retreat in beautiful New Hampshire. Aside from the breathtaking change of color in Fall foliage, and hours spent canoeing on glassy water, the brief hiatus from BC allowed for a much-needed break from the chaos of college life. The retreat consisted of logistical training sessions and exercises in vulnerability, to equip the seventy or so junior and senior men on the retreat to be excellent leaders for our freshmen mentees. The weekend centered on sharing life stories, fun activities in the outdoors, and getting to know the seventy other men, all dedicated to the shared goal of bettering the Boston College community through our commitment. The retreat was not explicitly religious, but the moments and memories we shared reflected a beautiful part of the Christian faith: fellowship through community.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Worst Argument for the Death Penalty

 

 

by Marcus Otte

 

Last month, I wrote about the problem of “therapy culture.” I am sure that, for many readers, the influence of therapeutic thinking on the Left came readily to mind. But therapeutic priorities are far more pervasive than many would suspect. The Right is also affected. Perhaps the most disturbing evidence of this occurs in debates on capital punishment.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

The Patron Saints of Intentionality

 

by Jamie Myrose

 

While most Boston College students are just rolling out of bed, I have the great fortune of teaching second graders their catechism at St. Ignatius Parish on Sunday mornings. This is a relatively new experience for me, and I have found that I have just about as much to learn from my students as I have to teach them. This experience has shaped my understanding of who I want to be as a student here at Boston College—and more importantly—who God is calling me to be as a Catholic in conversation with the world.

Read More 0 Comments

Thu

26

Oct

2017

My First Lily Pad

 

 

by Hadley Hustead

 

In elementary school we are taught that all good stories have a climax, ranging from a simple resolution to existential breakthroughs. Tales without a pinnacle were boring and not worth expression. If this were the case, my life would not be a story worth sharing.

Read More 7 Comments
Appalachia 4
Appalachia 5
The Torch - Pope Francis
Agape Latte
Appalachia 1
Professor Goizueta
Professor Byers
Fr. Hughes S.J.
Appalachia 6
Appalachia 3

BC Torch on Facebook


Trending Articles


Walking the Talk by Annalise Deal


Christianity Finds Home in Israel by Albert Barkan


Euthanasia Debate by Annalise Deal and Gjergji Evangjeli