Wed

22

Feb

2017

Local Organization Protests Trump’s Immigration Order

 

by Brigid Rooney

 

Over 900 people, including a group of 55 Boston College students and faculty, gathered at Bethel AME Church in Jamaica Plain on the night of February 2 to participate in the event “For Such a Time as This.” Sponsored and coordinated by the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization (or GBIO), the evening was designed as a multi-faith call for social change that emphasized concrete action.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Vatican Legal Chief Opens Door for Divorced and Remarried Catholics

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

Cardinal Francesco Coccopalmerio, the president of the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, published a book that is turning heads in the Vatican. Writing about the eighth chapter of Pope Francis’ encyclical Amoris Laetitia, Coccopalmerio says that Catholics in “non-legitimate” living situations, like the divorced or civilly remarried, are allowed to receive Communion as long as their intention is to change their situation, but doing so would lead to further sin.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Pope Francis Convenes Commission for Translation of the Missal

 

by Sofia Infante

 

Pope Francis has announced that he has created a commission to review Liturgiam authenticam, the authoritative decree that puts forth guidelines on the translation of Latin liturgical texts into English and other languages. The document was crafted in 2001 with the intention of revising liturgical documents in order to bring them into conformity with Catholic doctrine. It replaced Comme le Prevoit, the Vatican document concerning the translation of liturgical books following the Second Vatican Council. Some of the notable changes enacted by Liturgiam authenticam include bringing back “and with your spirit,” instead of “and also with you.” It replaced the “We” in the Nicene Creed to “I.” It also incorporated the three-fold self-accusations in the Penitential act, “through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault,” in which the person strikes their breast three times. Among one of the most contentious alterations was replacing the less authentic phrase “for all” with “for many” during the consecration: “Take this, all of you, and drink from it: This is the cup of my blood, the blood of the new and everlasting covenant. It will be shed for you and for many for the forgiveness of sin. Do this in memory of me.”

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

State Supreme Court Rules Against Christian Florist in Religious Liberty Case

 

by Katie Daniels

 

Four years ago, a florist from Washington named Baronelle Stutzman refused to serve a same-sex wedding, saying her Christian religious beliefs defined marriage as between one man and one woman. On February 16, Washington state’s Supreme Court unanimously upheld a lower court ruling that said Stutzman’s actions violated the state’s anti-discrimination laws.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Trump Pivots Towards Pro-Life Movement

 

by Quentin Bet

 

On February 11, demonstrators protested the federal funding of Planned Parenthood at 220 rallies in 45 different states. “These rallies have sparked a national conversation about Planned Parenthood and whether they deserve the $430 million of federal funding they receive from taxpayers each year,” said Eric Scheidler, the executive director of the Pro-Life Action League in Chicago and the organizer behind the demonstrations.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Saint Blaise and the Role of the Corporeal

 

by Adriana Watkins

 

Here’s an experiment: stop a pedestrian walking down Commonwealth Avenue and inform them that, on a recent Friday, several million people worldwide lined up to have candles pressed on their necks. You may receive some comical responses. As strange as the statement sounds, however, it describes the feast of St. Blaise, celebrated on February 3rd and accompanied by a “blessing of the throats.” Though many of us are happy enough to accept the blessing as an obscure tradition, what do we know about its origins? How much do we know about St. Blaise himself? Asking ourselves these questions can help us explain the cherished custom to that bewildered pedestrian.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

SEEK Conference Gathers Thousands of Young Catholics

 

by Laura McLaughlin

 

SEEK is a biannual conference that draws thousands of college students from all over the country to explore their faith and hear from others about what it means to be Catholic. SEEK is a FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholic University Students) initiative that is part of their evangelization mission. FOCUS began as a response to Saint Pope John Paul II’s call for a new evangelization in Denver at the 1993 World Youth Day event. Since then, FOCUS has placed recent college graduates at over 100 college campuses to foster Catholic communities, help Catholic student grow in their faith, and introduce non Catholics to the Church.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Preparing for Ash Wednesday and Lent

 

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

“Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” This is yet another joyful Catholic phrase reminding us of our own mortality. But Ash Wednesday and the season of Lent goes deeper than this. Ash Wednesday is the beginning of the liturgical season of Lent, a forty-day preparation for Holy Week, culminating in Easter Sunday, when Catholics gather to bear witness to the Resurrection of Christ.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

St. Valentine

 

by Brian Grab

 

St. Valentine's Day can be a polarizing holiday. Some love it, some find it silly or unnecessary, but few on either side know what exactly it commemorates. In this regard, it bears a slight resemblance to St. Patrick's Day, a Boston favorite. Just as there's something holy and a bit mysterious behind the green-tinted beer, there's something similarly holy behind the hearts and flowers of St. Valentine's Day. Like any good Christian feast, this one is about love, love of God for humanity and love of humanity to God. Like any good saint’s day, it involves some heroic holiness.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

“The Beginning of Devotion”

 

 

 

by Libbie Steiner

 

 

“Attention is the beginning of devotion.” In a perfectly distilled phrase of just six words, poet Mary Oliver commanded my consideration. I wasn’t exactly sure what it meant, but I knew that I wanted to know. I knew that it was significant and truthful. There was something about it that made me want to let the words sink into my soul.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

On Lent and Ascesis

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

With Lent approaching fast, it is perhaps particularly important to give some thought to the topic of fasting and—more importantly—ascesis. The Church from Her earliest days—as is evident from the Didache—has prescribed particular days and times when one is expected to fast. Why is it that we fast, what is the point of it and what is its benefit?

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What is Faith?

 

 

by Annalise Deal

 

 

Earlier this month Father Greg Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries and author of Tattoos on the Heart, spoke at BC. Of all of the wise things he said, it was one of his responses during the Q&A that hit me the hardest. Someone asked him what role faith plays in the recovery and integration of gang members at Homeboy, and he responded first with another question: “what is faith?”

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What Are We Marching For?

 

by Katie Daniels

 

It’s a cold and sunny day in late January and the city is flooded with people. Hundreds of thousands of women and men, many wearing pink hats and carrying pink signs, march in peaceful protest through the streets. Young moms push strollers, church groups sing hymns, and students snap pictures of the crowds. Even though many of the marchers have traveled a long way to be here, everyone is cheerful and courteous, excited to be standing in solidarity for a common cause.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

What Neil Gorsuch Could Mean for the Supreme Court

 

by Armen Grigorian

 

On January 31, 2017, President Donald J. Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch, a judge of the United State Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit to be the next member of United States Supreme Court. He was nominated to this position by President George W. Bush and has been serving in this role since 2006. Jude Gorsuch’s’ nomination is to fill the seat left vacant by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia last year. Since Justice Scalia’s passing there have been eight members sitting on the Supreme Court, four of which tend to have a more conservative approach to interpreting the Constitution, and four of which have a more liberal approach to interpreting it. This breakdown of the Supreme Court hold particular significance due to the fact that a 4-4 tie when the justices vote on a case means that the holding of the lower court gets upheld and no precedent is set. This rule has impacted multiple cases since the death of Justice Scalia, and has held up multiple rulings. Judge Gorsuch’s potential impact on the Supreme Court is quite substantial as his vote may be the deciding one on multiple cases.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Moonlight: A Review

 

by Niyobuhungiro Godfroid

 

Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight tells the story of a young boy as he struggles with questions of identity and life in Miami’s ghettos. The film and the story stay away from gruesome depictions of the inner city and instead focus on the psychological experience of its main character Chiron. Outwardly, it is a story about a gay black male dealing with issues of sexuality, identity, and manhood. At its core, however, it is a work clearly concerned with a universal feeling of loss and rejection. Throughout the film’s three acts the audience is placed in Chiron’s shoes and sees both the beauty and pains of his life, the audience comes to deeply empathize with a character whose specific circumstances are singular but whose mental and emotional life feel universal.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

The Fate of Fr. Rodrigues and the Mission to Japan [Spoilers]

 

 

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

 

Almost all of my friends who watched Silence before me left the movie with some big questions regarding the ending, so when I first watched it, I had already formed the opinion that I needed to pay close attention to what went on, especially toward the end of the movie. Those who have seen the movie know that the ending, is deeply unsettling, because it seems that ultimately, after watching so many instances of heroic faith, the solution proposed is to feign apostacy and hope for the best.

 

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Boston College’s Pro-Life Club Attends The March for Life

 

by Bianca Passero

 

Members of Boston College’s Pro Life Club attended the 44th annual March for Life on January 27, 2017 with close to a million of other pro-lifers from across the country and world. The March for Life is the nation’s largest peaceful protest for human rights. Every year people gather in Washington D.C. on the anniversary of the passing of the Supreme Court Case Roe v. Wade that legalized abortion on January 22, 1973. Attendance was estimating at 750,000, which is the most out of any year. The majority of the people who attended the March were high school and college students and young adults, as well as many families.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Mattapan Takes in PULSE

 

by Luke Heineman

 

If the spirit of PULSE could be expressed in one statement, it would be Philippians 2:3: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves.” PULSE is a service-learning program that combines classwork with community service. With 55 community partners throughout Boston, students are given the opportunity to learn from people outside the classroom ranging from supervisors at non-profit agencies to marginalized populations in neighborhoods throughout the city. Until recently, however, Boston’s southern neighborhood of Mattapan, a name rarely uttered on campus, had been omitted from the services of PULSE.

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Administration and Students Respond to Muslim Ban

 

by Annalise Deal

 

On January 27, President Trump issued an executive order indefinitely banning refugees from Syria, and placing a 90-day suspension on immigrants entering the country from seven other predominantly Muslim nations. Two days later, Boston College President Fr. William Leahy and other top university officials joined the ranks of higher education administrators who spoke out against the ban. In an email sent out to the entire Boston College community, the administrators clearly stated their opposition:

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Wed

22

Feb

2017

Being Reached by the Widow, Orphan, and Stranger

by Eileen Corkery

 

 

Fr. Gregory Boyle, S.J., spoke at Boston College on the night of Tuesday, February 7 before an overflowing Robsham Theater. Boyle is the founder of Homeboy Industries, a gang-intervention program located in the heart of Los Angeles. Established in 1992, Homeboy is now the largest gang rehabilitation and reentry program in the world. Boyle is also the author of the 2010 The New York Times Best Seller, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion, a series of parables and essays inspired by his time working in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, known as the ‘gang capital of the world.’

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

My Architect: A Son’s Journey

by Laura McLaughlin

 

A son loses the father he never really knew and, years later, goes on a quest to know his father through them. He documents his journeys across the globe as he visits his architect father’s buildings, former colleagues and lovers, and his half siblings. Nathaniel Kahn’s film, My Architect: A Son’s Journey, is not so much about the iconic buildings designed by his father Louis Kahn as it is about relationships, family, life and love.

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

The Simplicity of Taizé Prayer

by Jeffrey Lindholm

 

Imagine walking into a church. Electric lights illuminate the altar, people are talking quietly, and the congregation worships through a form of the Eucharistic Prayer. Is this the case in Taizé? Quite the opposite. The scene is a dark church, with candles as the only source of light. Students, adults, and clergy members surround an altar formed by lit candles and a San Damiano crucifix. Prayer is quite simple, with one- or two-line chants. Participation is optional; one can take in the beauty of Taizé or join in on the simple refrains.

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

The Hope of the Epiphanies

by Dante Keeler

 

As we prepare for finals over the next few weeks, there is a light down the road that brightens our paths, the same light that lit the way for the Magi to approach Bethlehem. This light is the light of Christ as he comes into the world; we know the familiar images of shepherds, kings, and angels that come to worship him. Celebrated on January 6, the feast of the Epiphany commemorates different things, depending on which branch of Christianity you belong to. It’s one of the oldest feasts celebrated in the Christian tradition, and predates the celebration of Christmas. Originally (and still today, in some Eastern Catholic and Orthodox traditions), the feast of the Epiphany celebrated four different events: the Nativity, the adoration of the Magi, the Baptism of Jesus, and the first miracle at the wedding in Cana. Most Catholics think of the Epiphany as referring to the second event, the arrival of the Magi. All four of these events are revelations of God to man; I like to think of them as each revealing a different part about Jesus’ character as fully human and fully divine. That’s what Epiphany means, after all: a revelation.  

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Why Do We Care So Much About Black Friday?

by Gjergji Evangjeli

 

For many, the idea of Black Friday brings a feeling of excitement. Sales, savings, door busters, and discounts excite millions across the country. However, for a growing number of Americans, the thought of Black Friday brings with it thoughts of disgust.  Long lines, stores opening on Thanksgiving, and businesses taking advantage of consumers are just some of the complaints that people have about Black Friday. Despite the debate, retailers continue to make billions of dollars in one day, and customers continue to flock to their stores. 

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Tue

06

Dec

2016

Advent: It’s Lit

by Eileen Corkery

 

“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” In the Christian tradition, light is a symbol of God. It has come to represent hope in the face of despair and clarity in the face of confusion. However, what is it about light that is so captivating to humans? From contraband twinkly lights in dorm rooms, to bonfires on the beach, to flickering candlelit dinners, people are continually enchanted by light. 

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